Documents for the Study of the Gospels

By David R. Cartlidge; David L. Dungan | Go to book overview

The Life of Moses
Philo of Alexandria

Introduction: Philo of Alexandria (c. 30 B.C.—A.D. 50) was born into one of the wealthiest and most influential Jewish families in Alexandria. The family undoubtedly enjoyed the rights of Roman citizenship, even though they were Jews by descent and religious observance. While serving as a judge in the large Jewish community in Alexandria, Philo found time for extensive writing and set forth his notion of the religious heritage of Israel in terms of a variety of Greek philosophical concepts. As such, he is often referred to as an excellent example of that period during which the interpenetration of Greek and Jewish modes of belief and culture were at a peak in Alexandria. It is within this upper-class, educated, cosmopolitan context that Philo addressed his Greek-speaking Alexandrian friends about the revered Lawgiver of the Jews: Moses.

Philo did not portray Moses in a manner strictly identical with the biblical portrait of Moses. It is certain that he considered the Five Books of Moses as totally divine and Heaven-inspired. This high estimation led him to paint an extremely exalted portrait of Moses himself—i.e., as a divine/human savior God. Consider the following quotations:1

“But there are others whom God leads higher, preparing them to soar above
every species and genus (on earth) to position them near himself. Such an One
was Moses about whom he says, ‘But you stand here with Me’ (Deut. 5:31).
This is what is indicated by the fact that when Moses was about to die he was
not, having been abandoned, ‘added to his fathers’ like the other (patriarchs)
nor, as if he were changeable, was anything added or taken from him, but he
was bodily removed (from earth to Heaven) ‘through the Word’ (dia rhēmatos)
of the First Cause (aitia; Deut. 34:5), that is, through the same Word by which
the entire universe was created.

From this you may leam that the God who works in all things considers the
wise man (sophos) to be worthy of honor equal to the Word (logos) itself, for
he lifts up the perfect man (teleios) from earthly things to himself.

For not even when God permitted Moses to associate as a loan to earthly
creatures did he confer upon him merely ordinary virtue (arétf), like that of a
ruler or king, to master the passions of his soul. Rather he elected him to be
God and Leader, showing thereby that the whole region of the body and the
mind that rules it were his subjects and slaves. ‘For I give you,’ said he, ‘to

1. We are indebted for the following discussion and references to E. R. Goodenough, An
Introduction to Philo Judaeus,
2nd ed. (New York: Barnes & Noble, 1962), pp. 145–51.

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Documents for the Study of the Gospels
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 299

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.