Southeast Asia in World History

By Craig A. Lockard | Go to book overview

Index
Page numbers in bold indicate illustrations.
Abang Haji Mustapha, 146
Abu Dulaf, 34
Acapulco, 82
Acheh. See also Indonesia
Dutch control, 96
maritime trade, 66
Naruddin al-Raniri, 70
Portuguese empire, 77
rebellion, 177
Sumatra, 70, 176, 204
women rulers, 71
Afghanistan, 196
Africa
Austronesian migrations, 15
Funan Kingdom, 26
Homo erectus, 5
Indo-European, 17
Islam, 51, 64
maritime trade, 36, 66
Zheng He, 67
age of commerce, 64
Agni, 24
agriculture. See also cash crops; individual crops
Austronesian migrations, 13–16, 18
Burma, 7
Cambodia, 194
and colonialism, 121, 131
early settlements, 11
Hindu-Javanese Kingdom, 46
improvements, 64
Indonesia, 174
Laos, 194
slash-and-burn, 12–13
Southeast Asia, 7–8, 33
subsistence farmers, 125
Aguinaldo, Emilio, 114–15
Ahmad, Shahnon, 168, 188
Ahmad Badawi, Abdullah, 187
AIDS, 183
air pollution, 174, 183, 187
Aisyah, 136
Al Qaeda, 177
Alaungp’aya, 53
Albuquerque, Affonso de, 77
alcohol, 123
al-Hady, Syed Shakkh, 93
alms-giving, 70
alphabet, 22, 103
alternative schools, 132
Ambon Island, 86
“American Junk,” 180
Amsterdam, 88, 118
An Duong, 107
Ananda Temple, 43
ancestor worship, 29, 60
Angkhan Kalayanaphong, 183
Angkor Kingdom
Angkor Thom, 40
Angkor Wat, 40, 41
cultural diversity, 131
decline of, 48
Golden Age, 38
rice cultivation, 36
slavery, 42
social structure, 42
Tai people, 48
trade, 39, 40, 42
warfare, 40
wet-rice cultivation, 41–42
Anglo-Burman War, 108–10
Angrok, 37
Anh Vien, 157
animal husbandry, 8, 11, 15–16
animism
Borneo, 70, 101
and Buddhism, 35, 40, 49, 59
and Christianity, 35
and Confucianism, 35
and Hinduism, 25, 35
Ibans, 101
and Islam, 35, 51, 67, 70
Java, 71
myths/beliefs, 19
Philippines, 70, 80–81, 83
shamans, 19
Sulawesi, 70
Vietnam, 29
Annam, 104
anticolonialism, 159
Anwar, Chairul, 152–53
Anwar Ibrahim, 187
Aotearoa. See New Zealand
Apo Hiking Society, 180
aquaculture, 25
Aquino, Benigno, 178

-227-

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