Lebanon: A History, 600-2011

By William Harris | Go to book overview

GLOSSARY

Unless otherwise specified, non-English and non-French terms are Arabic. The Lebanese communities (Christian sects, Sunni and Shia Muslims, and Druze and Alawites), modern Lebanese political parties, and most Eastern Christian terms are defined in the main text and are therefore not included here.

AbbasidsThe caliphs from the Abbasid branch of the Prophet Muhammad’s family, who ruled much of the Islamic world from Iraq after displacing the Umayyads in 749. They lost control of areas beyond Iraq by the early ninth century.
AhdThe period of a president’s tenure in modern Lebanon
Ahl al-AsiyaA medieval term for the people of the Kisrawan hills north of Beirut
AjnadSee jund
Alim (pl. ulema)Muslim religious scholar
Amir tablkhanaThe second officer rank in the Mamluk forces. It carried the entitlement to have forty horsemen in the officer’s service and to have a musical band (tablkhana) perform at the officer’s residence.
AmmiyaCommoner uprising in nineteenth-century Mount Lebanon
AqdiyaSee qada
Arabismideology of (political) unity among Arabs

-xv-

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Lebanon: A History, 600-2011
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Studies in Middle Eastern History ii
  • Title Page v
  • Table of Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • A Note on Transliteration xiii
  • Glossary xv
  • Timeline for Lebanon and Its Communities xxiii
  • Introduction 3
  • Part One - Foundations 27
  • 1 - Emerging Communities, 600–1291 29
  • 2 - Druze Ascent, 1291–1633 66
  • 3 - Mountain Lords, 1633–1842 104
  • Part Two - Modern Lebanon 145
  • 4 - Emerging Lebanon, 1842–1942 147
  • 5 - Independent Lebanon, 1943–1975 193
  • 6 - Broken Lebanon, 1975–2011 232
  • Conclusion 277
  • Abbreviations 285
  • Notes 287
  • Bibliography 323
  • Index 335
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