Aggressive Nationalism: McCulloch v. Maryland and the Foundation of Federal Authority in the Young Republic

By Richard E. Ellis | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

During the research and writing of this book I have incurred many obligations which I am pleased to recognize. Research for the book, which is part of a much larger project on the transition from Jeffersonian to Jacksonian democracy, was made possible by grants from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Council of Learned Societies. I also received support from the Thomas Lockwood Chair in American History at the University of Buffalo. I owe a particular debt to the late Gerald Gunther of the Stanford University Law School who encouraged me to take on this project and helped point me in a number of fruitful directions. I have also received various favors from Alfred Konefsky, Rob Steinfeld, and Don McGuire. Lynn Mather of the Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy of the University of Buffalo arranged a book manuscript workshop where Mark Graber of the University of Maryland and Martin Flaherty of the Fordham University School of Law made a number of helpful observations. Of great value also were the comments of the anonymous readers of the manuscript for Oxford University Press that were both encouraging and useful. James Cook, my editor at Oxford, was enthusiastic about the manuscript from the beginning and has been a pleasure to work with. Finally, I am enormously grateful to Mike Antonas, a high-powered engineer in his own right, who diligently typed and computerized the manuscript.

Finally, there are my grandchildren, Zachary Antonas, Joseph Ellis, Alexander Antonas, David Ellis, Zoe Antonas, Michael Ellis, and Sarah Moses, who I hope someday will enjoy seeing their names in print. Although they contributed nothing directly to the manuscript, they have immeasurably enriched my life.

-vii-

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Aggressive Nationalism: McCulloch v. Maryland and the Foundation of Federal Authority in the Young Republic
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 3
  • One- The U.S. Supreme Court versus the States 13
  • Two- The Second Bank of the United States 33
  • Three- The States versus the Second Bank of the United States 61
  • Four- McCulloch V. Maryland 77
  • Five- Virginia’s Response to McCulloch V. Maryland 111
  • Six- Ohio and the Bank of the United States 143
  • Seven- Ohio and Georgia before the U.S. Supreme Court 169
  • Eight- Coda 193
  • Notes 219
  • Index 257
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