New Lamps for Old: A Sequel to the Enchanted Glass

By Hardin Craig | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
FREEDOM

A New Freedom--a Liberty we learned and deepened to match the broadened life of man in modern America, restoring to him in very truth the control of his government, throwing wide all gates of lawful enterprise, unfettering his energies, and warming the generous impulses of his heart,--a process of release, emancipation, and inspiration, full of a breath of life as sweet and wholesome as the airs that filled the sails of the caravels of Columbus and gave the promise and boast of magnificent opportunity in which Americadare not fail.-- Woodrow Wilson, A Crossroads to Freedom.

WE MAY fairly conclude that we as humanists in the field of language and literature are still positivistic in our philosophy and may therefore be obliged to operate according to many restrictions. Before, however, we conclude that we are hedged about with various kinds of harmful limitations and that lack of intellectual liberty is a bad thing for us, let us consider freedom as an eternal idea of essential importance, and, if we decide that it is, let us cite certain reasons afforded by the new epistemology why our subject of all subjects should not be narrowed in its scope and disregarded in its function.

One would admit, to begin with, that there are various kinds and degrees of freedom. Mediaeval people, for example, were restricted by social barriers, supposed to be provided by God in His creation, and

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New Lamps for Old: A Sequel to the Enchanted Glass
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I - An Open World 1
  • Chapter II - Enclosed Areas 26
  • Chapter III - Eternal Ideas 47
  • Chapter IV - Partial Truth 65
  • Chapter VI - Freedom 119
  • Chapter VII - The History of Avoidance 140
  • Chapter VIII - Scholarship and Criticism 166
  • Chapter IX - Renaissance 1 185
  • Chapter X - Renaissance 2 208
  • Bibliographical Notes 227
  • Index 239
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