New Lamps for Old: A Sequel to the Enchanted Glass

By Hardin Craig | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
THE HISTORY OF AVOIDANCE

So, because it is subjected in the mind of a man, the law of imitation, of resemblance, remains constant for our art, but in a sense purified. It must transpose the secret rules of being in the manner of producing the work, and it must be faithful and exact, in transforming reality according to the laws governing the work to be done, as science in conforming thereto. What it makes must resemble not the material appearance of things, but some one of the hidden significances whose iris God alone sees glittering on the neck of his creatures--and for that very reason it will also resemble the created mind which in its own way discerned those invisible colours. Resemblance, but a spiritual resemblance. Realism, if you like, but transcendental realism.--Maritain, Art and Scholasticism.

IF ONE reads the quotation at the head of this chapter, one might also read this, which is an anonymous poem in Ravenscroft's Deuteromelia:

We be three poor mariners,
Newly come from the seas;
We spend our lives in jeopardy,
While others live at ease;
Shall we go dance the round, the round,
Shall we go dance the round?
And he that is a bully boy
Come pledge me on this ground.

We care not for those martial men
That do our states disdain;
But we care for the merchant men
Who do our states maintain;

-140-

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New Lamps for Old: A Sequel to the Enchanted Glass
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I - An Open World 1
  • Chapter II - Enclosed Areas 26
  • Chapter III - Eternal Ideas 47
  • Chapter IV - Partial Truth 65
  • Chapter VI - Freedom 119
  • Chapter VII - The History of Avoidance 140
  • Chapter VIII - Scholarship and Criticism 166
  • Chapter IX - Renaissance 1 185
  • Chapter X - Renaissance 2 208
  • Bibliographical Notes 227
  • Index 239
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