Religion and Human Rights: An Introduction

By John Witte Jr.; M. Christian Green | Go to book overview

11
Religion and Freedom
of Expression

CAROLYN EVANS*

If freedom of religion were to disappear overnight from the various treaties, constitutions, and statutory bills of rights in which it is currently found, much that is currently protected as religion could equally be covered as a manifestation of freedom of expression. While religion certainly has its contemplative internal dimension, most religions are also communicative in a variety of ways. Religious individuals may pray together, sing or chant, read from holy works, teach their children, write religious works of various kinds, preach, protest, and proselytize— all examples of free speech as well as the free exercise of religion. Additionally, religions make use of the realm of symbolic expression in a variety of ways: in religious dress, the display of religious symbols, the performance of religious rituals, and the wearing of religious items and particular hairstyles. These too are covered by the notion of freedom of expression in many jurisdictions.

While some forms of religious expression have remained beyond the realm of legitimate State intervention in democracies, others have proved much more contentious. One area of contention is proselytism or missionary activity: religious speech and associated activities that aim to convert others to the religion of the speaker. This is covered in the chapter herein by Paul Taylor. The current chapter explores several other areas of particular contention with respect to the overlap between freedom of expression and religion, in particular, the wearing of religious dress or symbols, hate speech and religious defamation, prayer or religious education in public schools, and religious symbols in public institutions.


WEARING RELIGIOUS CLOTHING OR SYMBOLS

Many religious believers feel either obligated by their religion or have a strong religiously motivated desire to wear clothing or religious symbols that express their adherence to a particular religion. Practices that some members of a religion may adopt include the wearing of a turban and kirpan (religious knife) by Sikh men, wearing a headcovering for Muslim and Jewish women, Rastafarians wearing their hair in dreadlocks, Jewish men wearing a yarmulke, and Christians wearing a cross.1 Individuals within the same religion may have different conceptions of what is required by their religion in this respect. For example, the English case of SB v. Denbigh High2 involved a Muslim student who wished to wear the stricter jilbab rather than the shalwar kameeze school uniform for Muslim girls

-188-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Religion and Human Rights: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 392

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.