New Lamps for Old: A Sequel to the Enchanted Glass

By Hardin Craig | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
SCHOLARSHIP AND CRITICISM

For philosophy, far the most important thing about the theory of relativity is the abolition of the one cosmic time and the one persistent space, and the substitution of space-time in place of both. This is a change of quite enormous importance, because it alters fundamentally our notion of the structure of the physical world, and has, I think, repercussions in psychology. It would be useless, in our day, to talk about philosophy without explaining this matter.-- Lord Russell, An Outline of Philosophy.

THE RELATION between scholarship and criticism is not difficult to understand, although the new philosophy applied to that relation introduces a few not difficult technical terms. It is the more easily comprehended because the new epistemology restores an original and natural concept. This explanation would no doubt be done with greater authenticity by a philosopher who knew literature if one could be found. Our era of narrow specialization forbids a scholar who professes literature to enter the field of philosophy, or even to look over the fence. But the matter is important, and somebody who understands it ought to make it clear. Since this is true, one hopes that one having only a layman's knowledge of philosophy will not be regarded as an ignorant intruder in the field. In any case, what is about to be said is a strictly literary matter.

The generally accepted theory of cognition rests on the concept of a four-dimensional space-time con-

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New Lamps for Old: A Sequel to the Enchanted Glass
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I - An Open World 1
  • Chapter II - Enclosed Areas 26
  • Chapter III - Eternal Ideas 47
  • Chapter IV - Partial Truth 65
  • Chapter VI - Freedom 119
  • Chapter VII - The History of Avoidance 140
  • Chapter VIII - Scholarship and Criticism 166
  • Chapter IX - Renaissance 1 185
  • Chapter X - Renaissance 2 208
  • Bibliographical Notes 227
  • Index 239
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