Roger Sherman and the Creation of the American Republic

By Mark David Hall | Go to book overview

APPENDIX

BY THE HONORABLE
JONATHAN TRUMBULL, Esq.;

Governor and Commander in Chief of the English Colony of
Connecticut in New-England.


A PROCLAMATION

The race of Mankind was made in a State of Innocence and Freedom, subjected only to the laws of GOD the CREATOR, and through his rich Goodness, designed for virtuous Liberty and Happiness here and forever; and when moral evil was introduced into the World, and Man had corrupted his Ways before GOD, Vice and Iniquity came in like a Flood, and Mankind became exposed, and a prey to the Violence, Injustice and Oppression of one another. GOD, in great Mercy, inclined his People to form themselves into Society, and to set up and establish civil Government for the Protection and Security of their Lives and Properties from the Invasion of wicked Men: But through Pride and Ambition, the King’s and Princes of the World, appointed by the People the Guardians of their Lives and Liberties, early and almost universally, degenerated into Tyrants, and by Fraud or Force betrayed and wrested out of their Hands the very Rights and Properties they were appointed to protect and defend. But a small Part of the Human Race maintained and enjoyed any tolerable Degree of Freedom. Among those happy few the Nation of Great-Britain was distinguished, by a Constitution of Government wisely framed and modeled, to support the Dignity and Power of the Prince, for the Protection of the Rights of the People; and under which, that Country in long Succession, enjoyed great Tranquility and Peace, though not unattended with repeated and powerful Efforts, by many of it’s haughty Kings, to destroy the constitutional Rights of the People, and establish arbitrary Power and Dominion. In one of those convulsive Struggles, our Forefathers having suffered in that, their native Country, great and variety of Injustice and

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Roger Sherman and the Creation of the American Republic
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The Old Puritan and a New Nation 1
  • 2 - Reformed Political Theory in the American Founding 12
  • 3 - Connecticut Politics and American Independence 41
  • 4 - Achieving Independence 63
  • 5 - "An Eel by the Tail" 92
  • 6 - Roger Sherman and the New National Government 122
  • 7 - "Philosophy May Mislead You. Ask Experience" 149
  • Notes 155
  • Appendix 213
  • Index 219
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