Taking Our Country Back: The Crafting of Networked Politics from Howard Dean to Barack Obama

By Daniel Kreiss | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many individuals and institutions shaped this book. I conducted the research for the early chapters on the Howard Dean campaign while writing my dissertation in the Department of Communication at Stanford University. I would like to thank the members of my dissertation committee, James Fishkin, Doug McAdam, Clifford Nass, Walter W. Powell, and Fred Turner, as well as the faculty of the department, especially Jeremy Bailenson, Theodore Glasser, Shanto Iyengar, and Jon Krosnick, for their immeasurable guidance in my research and thinking around new media and politics. Fred Turner has been a true mentor and friend since the beginning of my academic career, and I am deeply indebted to his scholarship and teaching. I could not have conducted this work at Stanford without the generous financial support of Rowland and Pat Rebele and the Nathan Maccoby family, as well as the incalculable administrative support of Susie Ementon and Barbara Kataoka.

The dissertation became a book during my time as a postdoctoral associate at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School. I am deeply thankful for the opportunity to research and write in such a rich intellectual environment. Jack Balkin and Laura DeNardis were supportive interlocutors as this book took shape, as were fellows Nicholas Bramble, Bryan Choi, and Seeta Pena Gangadharan. The book also benefited greatly from the insightful comments of those who encountered it as a work in progress at workshops and conferences during the past two years. In particular, I thank Michael Schudson, Richard John, Marshall Ganz, Jim Katz, Beth Noveck, Caroline Lee, Edward Walker, Patrick Lynn Rivers, Jeffrey Alexander, Nina Eliasoph, Jeremy Shtern, Fenwick Mckelvey, Aaron Shaw, Christina Dunbar-Hester, and Colin Agur for their comments on this work.

My colleagues in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have been immensely supportive through the final stages of research, writing, and revisions. I would particularly like to thank Rhonda Gibson, Sriram Kalyanaraman, Daren Brabham, Daniel

-vii-

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