New Lamps for Old: A Sequel to the Enchanted Glass

By Hardin Craig | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES

CHAPTER I
1. I have not been able to find any authoritative treatment of the relativistic theory of cognition. Some information will be found in Einstein The Meaning of Relativity ( Princeton, 1950) and Out of my Later Years ( New York, 1950); also in The Evolution of Physics by Einstein and Infeld ( New York, 1942). There are references in the various works of Whitehead, and of course Herman Minkowsky Erde und Zeit ( 1907) is fundamental. See also Contemporary Approaches to Cognition. Colorado Symposium ( Cambridge, Mass., 1957).
2. Woodrow Wilson entertained an almost mystical belief in the individual and social efficacy of liberty, or at least one may say that to him freedom was an eternal idea of supreme importance. This appears in reports of Wilson's 1912 campaign for election to the presidency of the United States. These are to be found in The New Freedom; a Call for the Emancipation of the Generous Energies of a People, compiled by W. B. Hale from the author's campaign speeches ( New York, 1913), and in a better version in A Crossroads of Freedom; the 1912 campaign speeches of Woodrow Wilson , ed. J. W. Davidson ( New Haven, 1956).
3. Susanne Langer, Philosophy in a New Key ( New York, 1948), with bibliography; C. K. Ogden and I. A. Richards, The Meaning of Meaning ( London, 1923); Die Philosophie der symbolischen Formen. 3 vols. ( Berlin, 1923, 1924, 1929); Rudolf Carnap, Meaning and Change of Meaning ( London, 1935); A. N. Whitehead, Symbolism, its Meaning and Effect ( New York, 1927).
4. C. D. Broad, The Philosophy of Francis Bacon ( Cambridge, 1926).
5. One of the best ways of arriving at an understanding of Baconian induction, its nature and claims as an epistemological method, is to consult the works of actual proponents

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New Lamps for Old: A Sequel to the Enchanted Glass
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I - An Open World 1
  • Chapter II - Enclosed Areas 26
  • Chapter III - Eternal Ideas 47
  • Chapter IV - Partial Truth 65
  • Chapter VI - Freedom 119
  • Chapter VII - The History of Avoidance 140
  • Chapter VIII - Scholarship and Criticism 166
  • Chapter IX - Renaissance 1 185
  • Chapter X - Renaissance 2 208
  • Bibliographical Notes 227
  • Index 239
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