Constructivist Theories of Ethnic Politics

By Kanchan Chandra | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

It is a pleasure to thank the many people who, while not responsible for the arguments we make here, have helped make the book better than it would otherwise be. Thanks are due first of all to Richard Stanley of the Department of Mathematics at MIT, for a short conversation that helped to set this book on its way. Several scholars provided writ en comments or discussed draft chapters at the conference on “Constructivist Approaches to Ethnic Identity” at the Center for International Studies at MIT, at panels at the American Political Science Association, the Association for the Study of Nationalities, the Laboratory of Comparative Ethnic Processes and the Joint Mathematics Meetings, and at seminars at Columbia University, Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, New York University, and the University of Washington. These include Dominique Arel, Robert Boyd, Tone Bringa, Rogers Brubaker, Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, Lars Erik Cederman, Michael Chwe, Alberto Diaz-Cayeros, Eric Dickson, David Epstein, Jonat an Farley, Robert Haydon, Michael Hechter, Jennifer Hochschild, Orit Kedar, Asim Khwaja, Janet Landa, Margaret Levi, Beatriz Magaloni, Saba Mahmood, Edward Miguel, Shaheen Mozaffar, James Scaritt, Suzanne Shanahan, Katherine Stovel, Steve Van Evera, Leonard Wantchekon, Jason Wittenberg and three anonymous reviewers. Many other scholars, too numerous to name here, have responded to sections of this manuscript, and we thank all of them. Dierdre Siddalls provided excellent support in the initial stages of planning. I am grateful to the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioural Sciences (CASBS) at Stanford University, the Harvard Academy of Area Studies, the MIT Center for International Studies, the Russell Sage Foundation, the Department of Political Science at MIT, and the Department of Politics at NYU for institutional and financial support. Finally, I would like to thank Oxford University Press for their painstaking work during the production process, and especially our editor, David McBride, for his sound advice and judgment.

Kanchan Chandra

-vii-

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