Great Games, Local Rules: The New Great Power Contest in Central Asia

By Alexander Cooley | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Though this book is a recent endeavor, I have accumulated enormous debts from the individuals and organizations that have supported this project and its previous components. I am especially grateful to the Fellows Program of the Open Society Foundations (OSF) for giving me the opportunity, as one of its inaugural Global Fellows (thanks to Lenny Benardo, Bipasha Ray, and Steve Hubbell), to think through these issues, conduct research travel, and benefit from engaging with its world-class network. I am also grateful to the Central Eurasia Project of OSF, especially to Anthony Richter, who encouraged me to think about the policy implications of my work on military bases and Western security engagement in Central Asia. The OSF foundations in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan (thanks to Kumar Bekbolotov and Zuhra Halimova), and Brussels greatly facilitated my field research. Additional support was provided by Barnard College, including a generous gift by the Tow family, and Columbia University’s Harriman Institute, including a Faculty Publication Grant, an educational exchange project with the Turkmen Ministry of Education, funds for my visit to the ODIHR office in Warsaw, and support through the 2010–2011 Core Project on Human Rights in the Post-Communist World, which I co-directed with Jack Snyder. I am also thankful to the members of the Columbia School of International and Public Affairs Capstone Project that I supervised in Spring 2011, who produced an excellent study on the political implications of China-Turkmen energy relations.

Different chapters and arguments developed in the book were presented at MIT, NYU, University of Toronto, Yale University, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Association for the Study of Nationalities, the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C., a National Committee on American Foreign Policy roundtable at the Kennan Institute, and a joint Columbia-Harvard conference on “How Central is Central Asia?” Overseas, I received valuable feedback at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, the 9th

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Great Games, Local Rules: The New Great Power Contest in Central Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 252

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.