The Acadian Diaspora: An Eighteenth-Century History

By Christopher Hodson | Go to book overview

3
The Tropics

And among these nations shalt thou find no ease, neither shall the sole
of thy foot have rest: but the Lord shall give thee there a trembling
heart, and failing of eyes, and sorrow of mind. And thy life shall hang in
doubt before thee; and thou shalt fear day and night.

—Deuteronomy 28:65–66

Even the most harried, downtrodden Acadian exile would have admitted it: by 1763, Louis XV had endured several bad years in a row. The king’s downward spiral began in January 1757, when an out-of-work domestic servant named Robert-François Damiens tried to kill him with a penknife on the steps of the royal palace at Trianon. Interrogated, tortured, and finally drawn and quartered in the center of Paris, Damiens haunted his victim. As a British spy reported that summer, Louis “frequently burst into tears” and even mused about abdicating the throne.1

By then, though, the king had much more to cry about. After a promising start in North America and Europe, his war had become a disaster. British and Prussian victories over the French and their Austrian allies had spread like a pox: Rossbach and Leuthen in 1757, Louisbourg and Gorée in 1758, Québec and Guadeloupe in 1759, Montréal in 1760, Pondicherry and Belle-Ile-en-Mer (a mere ten miles from the west coast of mainland France) in 1761, Martinique in 1762. Signed on February 10, 1763, the Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years’ War by humiliating Louis as few monarchs had been humiliated before. Although France kept the Caribbean colonies of Saint-Domingue, Guadeloupe, and Martinique, losses in Canada, West Africa, India, the Mediterranean, and Louisiana gave the defeat an air of finality. Worse, territorial downsizing offered limited financial help for the debt-burdened kingdom, forcing Louis to extend wartime taxes. For the Parisian diarist Edmond-Jean-François Barbier, it came as no surprise that two weeks after the peace, the spectacle of placing an equestrian statue of the king on its pedestal in the Place Louis XV (today’s Place de la Concorde)

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Acadian Diaspora: An Eighteenth-Century History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - The Worlds of the Acadian Diaspora 3
  • 1 - The Expulsion 15
  • 2 - The Pariahs 47
  • 3 - The Tropics 79
  • 4 - The Unknown 117
  • 5 - The Homeland 146
  • 6 - The Conspiracy 173
  • Conclusion - The Ends of the Acadian Diaspora 197
  • Abbreviations 213
  • Notes 215
  • Index 249
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.