The Acadian Diaspora: An Eighteenth-Century History

By Christopher Hodson | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction

1. David R. Slavitt, ed. and trans., Ovid’s Poetry of Exile (Baltimore:Johns Hopkins University Press, 1990), 122.

2. Susan L. Einbinder, No Place of Rest: Jewish Literature, Expulsion, and the Memory of Medieval France (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009), 54.

3. On population removals from antiquity through the present, see Andrew Bell-Fialkoff, Ethnic Cleansing (New York: St. Martin’s, 1996).

4. Historians and social scientists have engaged in a lively debate over the definition of diaspora. Some favor breadth, envisioning diaspora as a category that encompasses multiple models of dispersal, while others seek more rigor, classifying subsequent diasporas in relation to the original Jewish case or, alternatively, insisting on diaspora as a modern “stance” or “idiom” rather than a category of analysis good for all times and places. On this controversy, see Rogers Brubaker, “The ‘Diaspora’ Diaspora,” Ethnic and Racial Studies 28, no. 1 (January 2005): 1–19. Like the historian Maya Jasanoff, who has written eloquently of the “loyalist diaspora” in the wake of the American Revolution, I envision diaspora as a general notion flexible enough to accommodate diverse instances of dispossession and migration. See Jasanoff, Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World (New York: Knopf, 2011), 8.

5. On the Acadian population during the eighteenth century, see especially Stephen A. White, “The True Number of the Acadians,” in Ronnie-Gilles LeBlanc, ed., Du Grand Dérangement à la Déportation: Nouvelles perspectives historiques (Moncton, NB: Chaire d’études acadiennes, Université de Moncton, 2005), 21–56.

6. On Acadian neutrality in comparative perspective, see Jon Parmenter and Mark Power Robison, “The Perils and Possibilities of Wartime Neutrality on the Edges of Empire: Iroquois and Acadians Between the French and British in North America, 1744–1760,” Diplomatic History 31 (April 2007): 167–206.

7. “Journal of Abijah Willard of Lancaster, Mass., An Officer in the Expedition Which Captured Fort Beauséjour in 1755,” ed. J. C. Webster, Collections of the New Brunswick Historical Society 13 (1930): 41–42.

8. Thomas Hutchinson, The History of the Colony and Province of Massachusetts-Bay (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1936), 30. The best recent accounts of the 1755 expulsion are John Mack Faragher, A Great and Noble Scheme: The Tragic Story of the Expulsion of the French Acadians from Their American Homeland (New York: W. W. Norton, 2005), and Geoffrey Plank, An Unsettled Conquest: The British Campaign Against the Peoples of Acadia (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001).

9. Scholarly treatments of the Acadian diaspora include Emile Lauvrière, La tragédie d’un peuple: Histoire du peuple acadien de ses origines à nos jours, 2 vols. (Paris: Editions Bossard,

-215-

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The Acadian Diaspora: An Eighteenth-Century History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - The Worlds of the Acadian Diaspora 3
  • 1 - The Expulsion 15
  • 2 - The Pariahs 47
  • 3 - The Tropics 79
  • 4 - The Unknown 117
  • 5 - The Homeland 146
  • 6 - The Conspiracy 173
  • Conclusion - The Ends of the Acadian Diaspora 197
  • Abbreviations 213
  • Notes 215
  • Index 249
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