The Hearing Eye: Jazz & Blues Influences in African American Visual Art

By Graham Lock; David Murray | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book and its companion volume, Thriving on a Riff, initially took shape as part of a research project, to which we gave the rather grandiose title Criss Cross: Confluence and Influence in Twentieth-Century African American Music, Visual Art, and Literature. The project was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council of Great Britain and housed in the School of American and Canadian Studies at Nottingham University, and to them we are greatly indebted. Indeed, several of the book’s chapters began life as papers presented at the Criss Cross conferences we hosted at Nottingham in 2003 and 2004: thanks are due to our keynote speakers, panelists, chairs, and all the participants for their contributions (which, in 2004, included a poetry reading by Michael S. Harper); to the AHRC, the British Academy, and the University of Nottingham Research Committee for additional conference funding; and to everyone who provided administrative, artistic, technical, and other essential assistance, especially David A. Bailey, Sally Britten, Sheila Jones, Ali Norcott, Horace Ové, Shona Powell, Ellen Salway, Byron Wallen, John Walsh, and Jim Waters from Nottingham Castle Museum.

The School of American and Canadian Studies offered both financial backing and a supportive intellectual home for the project itself and our subsequent work on the books. We are grateful to our colleagues, notably Celeste-Marie Bernier, Ian Brookes, and Richard King, for their advice and encouragement, and to the school’s ever-efficient office staff for their help, especially Helen Taylor and Stuart Wright. We have also benefited from the aid of other Nottingham colleagues, in particular Mike Beard (Photography) and Mervyn Cooke (Music), as well as the conceptual swingers of the campus Jazz Listening and Reading Group. Generous grants from the University of Nottingham Research Committee and Dean’s Fund have enabled us to reproduce many paintings in full color in the first printing of this book.

-vii-

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