The Hearing Eye: Jazz & Blues Influences in African American Visual Art

By Graham Lock; David Murray | Go to book overview

Contributors

Richard Ings is a freelance writer and researcher in the arts, with an MA in Chinese studies (Cambridge) and an MA and a PhD, both in American studies (Nottingham), where his research thesis was Making Harlem Visible: Race, Photography and the American City 1915–1955. He has published essays and reviews on American photography, and lectured widely on visual culture and American realist art. His numerous arts publications include From the Favela to Our Manor: Translating AfroReggae (Queen Mary, University of London); Connecting Flights: Debating Globalisation, Diaspora and the Arts (British Council), and Making Radiowaves: Internet Radio and the Creative School (Cape UK).

Richard H. King is Professor Emeritus in American Intellectual History at the University of Nottingham. He is the author of A Southern Renaissance, of Civil Rights and the Idea of Freedom (both Oxford University Press), and, most recently, of Race, Culture and the Intellectuals, 1940–1970 (Wilson Center/Johns Hopkins University Press).

Graham Lock is a freelance writer and editor with special interests in music and African American culture. From 2001 to 2004 he was a Senior Research Fellow in the School of American and Canadian Studies at Nottingham University, working on the Criss Cross project. His books include Blutopia: Visions of the Future and Revisions of the Past in the Work of Sun Ra, Duke Ellington, and Anthony Braxton (Duke University Press), Chasing the Vibration: Meetings with Creative Musicians (Stride), and Forces in Motion: Anthony Braxton and the Meta-reality of Creative Music (Quartet). He is the author of numerous articles and liner notes and is co-editor, with David Murray, of Thriving on a Riff: Jazz & Blues Influences in African American Literature and Film (Oxford University Press).

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Hearing Eye: Jazz & Blues Influences in African American Visual Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 366

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.