The Hearing Eye: Jazz & Blues Influences in African American Visual Art

By Graham Lock; David Murray | Go to book overview

David Murray is Professor of American Studies at the University of Nottingham and was director of the Criss Cross research project. He has published widely on American Indians, including Indian Giving: Economies of Power in Early IndianWhite Exchanges (University of Massachusetts Press) and Forked Tongues: Speech, Writing, and Representation in North American Indian Texts (Indiana University Press), as well as on American poetry and cultural studies. His latest book is Matter, Magic, and Spirit: Representing Indian and African American Belief (University of Pennsylvania Press). He is co-editor, with Graham Lock, of Thriving on a Riff: Jazz & Blues Influences in African American Literature and Film (Oxford University Press).

Paul Oliver has published articles and record sleeve notes since the early 1950s, and first conducted extensive fieldwork on the blues in 1960. His books include Blues Fell This Morning: Meaning in the Blues, Conversation with the Blues, Savannah Syncopators: African Retentions in the Blues (republished as part of Yonder Come the Blues), Songsters and Saints (all Cambridge University Press), and The Story of the Blues (Northeastern University Press), among many others. He has also published several books on vernacular architecture and a three-volume world encyclopedia of the subject. A book of his radio scripts, Broadcasting the Blues: Black Blues in the Segregation Era, was published by Routledge.

Robert G. O’Meally is Zora Neale Hurston Professor of Comparative Literature at Columbia University, where he has also been Director of the Center for Jazz Studies. His numerous publications include Lady Day: The Many Faces of Billie Holiday (Arcade) and The Craft of Ralph Ellison (Harvard University Press). He is the editor of The Jazz Cadence of American Culture (Columbia University Press) and Living with Music: Ralph Ellison’s Jazz Writings (Modern Library); and co-editor of Uptown Conversation: The New Jazz Studies (Columbia University Press) and History and Memory in African American Culture (Oxford University Press).

Robert Farris Thompson is Col. John Trumbell Professor of the History of Art and Master of Timothy Dwight College at Yale. He has organized several major exhibitions, notably the Four Moments of the Sun (1981) and the Face of the Gods: Shrines and Altars of the Black Atlantic World (1985) at the National Gallery of Art. His numerous books and exhibition catalogues include African Art and Motion (National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC), Flash of the Spirit: Afri-

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