The Hearing Eye: Jazz & Blues Influences in African American Visual Art

By Graham Lock; David Murray | Go to book overview

Index
Figures in bold denote illustrations.
AACM. See Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians
Abrams, Muhal Richard, 157, 168n.2
abstract expressionism, 6, 95–103, 113–14, 152, 222, 231, 262–63, 265–66. See also abstraction; action painting; Pollock, Jackson
and jazz, 107–8, 138–39
New York School of, 96, 98, 130, 138
semi-abstract expressionism. See under Piper, Rose
abstraction. See also abstract expressionism
and figural elements, 101, 105, 107–9, 200–206, 262, 336
and music, 14n.23, 105, 107–9, 116n.30, 212n.18, 321, 336
action painting, 98, 138, 265, 346
advertising art for early blues recordings, 7, 21–44. See also sheet music
artwork in, 30–34, 36–38, 40–42
humor in, 30–31, 34
lyrics illustrated in, 33–35, 36–38
performers illustrated in, 28, 30, 33, 42
placement of, in black newspapers, 26, 28–30 (see also Chicago Defender)
racial stereotyping in, 38, 41
vignettes, use of, 36–38
African American aesthetic. See black aesthetic
African art, 86, 89, 102, 154, 155, 163, 187–88n.3. See also AFRICOBRA
African masks, 2, 82, 138, 163, 208, 264, 266, 274
AFRICOBRA, 8, 150, 152–57, 158–59
Afro (aka A. Basaldella), 130
Alston, Charles, 2, 11n.8, 48
works by: Blues Singers I–IV (series), 65n.13
akLaff, Pheeroan, 341
Andrews, Benny, 2, 11n.8
works by: Music (series), 2
Musical Interlude (series), 2
Armstrong, Louis, 123, 208, 214n.23, 235, 311, 314
and St James Infirmary (painting), 236, 242–44
works by: “Mack the Knife,” 244
“What Did I Do to Be So Black and Blue,” 326
Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM), 150, 151, 157–58, 159, 164, 168n.2
Attucks, Crispus, 287
Bach, J. S., 123, 286, 289, 296
works by: Well-Tempered Clavier, 288
BAG. See Black Artists’ Group
Baker, Houston, A., Jr., 4, 186
Baker, Josephine, 8, 73, 86–88
works in: Josephine Baker’s Farewell, 87
Baldwin, James, 131
Banjo Joe (aka Gus Cannon): “Madison Street Rag,” 31, 32
Banks, Ellen, 2, 8, 282–99
on classical music, 285, 286, 288, 289, 292–94, 295, 296
on color and music, 283, 287, 293, 298n.4
on encaustics, 295–96, 299n.9
on improvisation, 293
on race and art, 286–87, 289–90, 296–97
on spirituals, 290, 294
on texture and music, 288, 296
works by: Chopin Études (series), 292
Diabelli Variations (series), 296
Improvisations (series), 293–94
Maple Leaf Rag (series), 283–85, 292
Maple Leaf Rag (page 1), 284, 298n.4
Motif (series), 294
Oracle (series), 289
Oracle #244, 290
Scarlatti Sonatas (series), 292
Scarlatti Sonata, Allegro in A, 292

-357-

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