The Invention of Greek Ethnography: From Homer to Herodotus

By Joseph E. Skinner | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

While the eclectic nature of this book renders ellipses and solecisms all but inevitable, the remainder bears witness to the enduring patience and unswerving generosity of one individual in particular. Thomas Harrison first introduced me to Greek ethnography—and Herodotus—during my undergraduate studies at the University of St. Andrews. Then, as now, his passion for his subject was both infectious and inspiring, but this has been more than matched by the kindness and wisdom that he has subsequently displayed in his capacity as teacher, supervisor, and friend. I have also benefited from the help and support of a veritable cohort of benefactors who gave freely of their time and knowledge, whether by reading chapter sections or inspiring conversation. Christopher Tuplin, Zosia Archibald, Robin Osborne, Kostas Vlassopoulos, Catherine Morgan, Eran Almagor, Theodora Hadjimichael, Amy Coker, Sean Gurd, and Lin Foxhall have all read and commented on chapter sections; it goes without saying that they bear no responsibility for any errors that remain. I am particularly indebted to Lin for years of help and support in her capacity as “archaeological mentor” and remain deeply grateful for both the initial opportunity to participate in the Bova Marina Archaeological Project (BMAP) and permission to publish data from the site at San Salvatore. Participation in BMAP brought with it a chance to consider broad-brush questions of identity and difference in a regional setting in the company of scholars who have all influenced my outlook and approach in one way or another (notably John Robb, Jonathan Prag, Hamish Forbes, and David Yoon). Discussions with Irad Malkin, Ian Jenkins, John Davies, Matthew Fitzjohn, Andrew Meadows, and Renee Hirschon have been a great source of help and inspiration, while Michael Sommer provided advice and support at the drop of a hat. Graham Oliver and Phiroze

-ix-

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The Invention of Greek Ethnography: From Homer to Herodotus
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter 1 - Ethnography before Ethnography 3
  • Chapter 2 - Populating the Imaginaire 59
  • Chapter 3 - Mapping Ethnography 111
  • Chapter 4 - Mapping Identities 151
  • Chapter 5 - The Invention of Greek Ethnography 233
  • Abbreviations 259
  • Bibliography 263
  • Index 327
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