The Jury and Democracy: How Jury Deliberation Promotes Civic Engagement and Political Participation

By John Gastil; E. Pierre Deess et al. | Go to book overview

About the Authors

The four authors of this book have worked on this project since 1997, when they first began collecting data on jury service and voting. Each has undertaken distinct responsibilities, with John Gastil serving as the principal author.

John Gastil is a professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington. Each of his previous books are relevant to the current project, including Democracy in Small Groups (New Society, 1993), By Popular Demand (University of California, 2000a), Political Communication and Deliberation (Sage, 2008), The Group in Society (Sage, 2010), and the co-edited volume, The Deliberative Democracy Handbook (Jossey-Bass, 2005). He has published relevant works in Communication Theory, Political Communication, Small Group Research, and other scholarly journals.

Perry Deess is the Director of Institutional Research and Planning at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Throughout this project, he had primary responsibility for data processing, survey implementation, theoretical background, and editing. He has published relevant works in Journal of Politics, Mobilization, and other journals and has written reports on law and public opinion at the Vera Institute of Justice and the Institute for Public Policy. He also has numerous publications in the fields of institutional assessment, program evaluation, and education.

Philip J. Weiser is a professor in the School of Law at the University of Colorado. He analyzed the legal and historical context of this research and has drawn out many of its implications. He is coauthor of Digital Crossroads: American Telecommunications Policy in the Internet Age (MIT, 2005) and has written articles and chapters relevant to this project in Deliberation, Democracy, and the Media (Rowman & Littlefield, 2000), the New York

-259-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Jury and Democracy: How Jury Deliberation Promotes Civic Engagement and Political Participation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents xi
  • Figures xiii
  • Tables xv
  • Photos xix
  • Chapter 1 - Freedom in Our Hands 3
  • Chapter 2 - Between State and Society 12
  • Chapter 3 - From Jury Box to Ballot Box 26
  • Chapter 4 - Answering the Summons 52
  • Chapter 5 - Citizen Judges 73
  • Chapter 6 - From Courthouse to Community 106
  • Chapter 7 - Civic Attitude Adjustment 129
  • Chapter 8 - Securing the Jury 154
  • Chapter 9 - Political Society and Deliberative Democracy 173
  • Further Reading 193
  • Methodological Appendix 195
  • Notes 215
  • References 241
  • About the Authors 259
  • Index 261
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 267

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.