INDEX
a cognitionibus, 659–60
Accius, 251, 407, 697
Achilles, 702, 706, 718, 765–67
Acilius Severus (cos. 323), 178–79
Clodius Celsinus signo Adelphius (PVR 351), 33, 331–32, 333, 776
adnotare, 488–90
Adrianople, battle of, 42, 48, 98, 215, 340, 342
Aeneas, 216, 708–11, 736
as flamen Dialis, 587–88, 606
Aetius, 204–5
agathothelēs, 663
as character in Saturnalia, 195, 231, 233–34, 239, 240, 244, 246, 260–61
Alaric, 47, 190–91, 194, 213, 215, 216, 217, 288, 339, 340, 398, 512, 672, 673, 689, 692
Caecina Decius Aginatius Albinus (cos. 444), 49, 240, 260
Caecina Decius Albinus (PVR 402), 187, 195, 233–34, 240, 260–61
Caeionius Rufius Albinus (PVR 389–91), 56–57, 64–65, 196, 234, 240, 393, 517–19
as character in the Saturnalia, 231, 233–34, 240, 251, 260, 268, 393
Caeionius Rufius Albinus (PVR 335), 138, 360, 528
Alexander the Great, 294, 761, 630, 752, 761, 764–70
Alexander literature, 373–74, 560–64, 779
Alexander Romance, 373, 555, 560–64
Alexander Severus, 413, 558
Alexandria, 60, 63, 74, 444, 694, 783
Alföldi, Andrew, 4, 8, 148, 206, 377, 691–98, 745, 789
allusion, literary, 406, 764, 767–69
Altar of Victory, 5, 8, 33–51, 58, 317, 362, 690, 693, 715
and Ambrose, 35–36, 39, 40–44, 46, 58, 75–89, 202
and Christianization, 184–85
and the Contra Symmachum, 337–43
and cult subsidies, 41–48, 75–89
and Gratian, 5, 34, 47, 39–51, 201–2
and the statue of Victory, 341–42
not mentioned by Zosimus, 645
Faltonius Probus Alypius (PVR 391), 331–32, 378, 380, 517–19, 778
Ambrose, 34–36, 68, 75–89, 176, 365–66, 385, 414, 752
ability to read silently, 485
knowledge of Greek, 533, 535
and Battle of the Frigidus, 112–26
and Eugenius, 75–89, 122
and Gratian, 34–35, 37, 83, 120, 122, 202
and Maximus, 76, 87, 122
letters of, 89, 416
and Symmachus, 36, 202, 203
and Vergil, 568.
and Theodosius, 58, 63–64, 76, 80–82, 83, 86, 87–89, 112–13, 123–24
and Valentinian II, 36–37, 87
Ambrosiaster, 148, 283, 287, 324, 435, 796
Ammianus, 182, 220–25, 293–94, 334, 362, 499, 556–57, 631, 636, 669, 677, 683, 749–50
and Annales of Flavian, 632–33, 668–69, 674, 675
biligualism of, 530–31, 641
classicism of, 221–22
date of publication, 632–33, 634
and Eunapius, 670, 673, 676, 681

-855-

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The Last Pagans of Rome
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Introduction 3
  • 1- Pagans and Polytheists 14
  • 2- From Constantius to Theodosius 33
  • 3- The Frigidus 93
  • 4- Priests and Initiates 132
  • 5- Pagan Converts 173
  • 6- Pagan Writers 206
  • 7- Macrobius and the "Pagan" Culture of His Age 231
  • 8- The Poem against the Pagans 273
  • 9- Other Christian Verse Invectives 320
  • 10- The Real Circle of Symmachus 353
  • 11- He "Pagan" Literary Revival 399
  • 12- Correctors and Critics I 421
  • 13- Correctors and Critics II 457
  • 14- The Livian Revival 498
  • 15- Greek Texts and Latin Translation 527
  • 16- Pagan Scholarship Vergil and His Commentators 567
  • 17- The Annales of Nicomachus Flavianus 1 627
  • 18- The Annales of Nicomachus Flavianus II 659
  • 19- Classical Revivals and "Pagan" Art 691
  • 20- The Historia Augusta 743
  • Conclusion 783
  • Appendix- The Poem against the Pagans 802
  • Selected Bibliography 809
  • Index 855
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