3
HUMAN ORGANISMS,
SOCIAL INDIVIDUALS, AND PERSONS

MY DAUGHTER ANNA WAS born in Vietnam, and we adopted her when she was nine months old. If Anna had remained with her birth family in Vietnam, her life would have been different in many respects. She would have grown up in a peasant culture in a rural hamlet instead of in a middle-class, nonagrarian American family. But in either scenario, Anna would be the same human organism; she would be the very same member of the human species. But Vietnamese Anna and American Anna would not be the same person, the same psychological individual. Clearly, Vietnamese Anna would have different memories than her American counterpart. Vietnamese Anna would have had different parents and siblings, a different nationality, and different life experiences from American Anna. She would also have had a different set of attitudes and moral dispositions from her American counterpart, since a child’s duty to her parents in a Confucian society like Vietnam are more rigorous and exacting than the expectations in contemporary American society.1 Using the standard psychological criteria for sameness of persons, Vietnamese Anna and American Anna would not be the same person.2

1. The PBS American Experience documentary “Daughter from Danang” depicts the misunderstanding that can result from culturally different expectations concerning the obligation of a child to a parent (and vice versa).

2. An objection to this point arises in relation to the causal theory of meaning, which imagines an initial baptism (or introducing event) that fixes the reference of a name to an individual, whose different careers and life experiences we can then

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Metaphysics of Gender
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface- Why Gender Essentialism? xi
  • 1- Two Notions of Essence 3
  • 2- Gender and Social Normativity 27
  • 3- Human Organisms, Social Individuals, and Persons 51
  • 4- The Argument for Gender Essentialism 75
  • 5- The Person, the Social Individual, and the Self 107
  • Epilogue- Gender Essentialism and Feminist Politics 127
  • Select Bibliography 133
  • Index 141
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 153

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.