The Pretenses of Loyalty: Locke, Liberal Theory, and American Political Theology

By John Perry | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. John Rawls, A Brief Inquiry into the Meaning of Sin and Faith: With “On My Religion,”ed. Thomas Nagel (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2009), 261.

2. “Seven Short Book Reviews,” Tikkun (May–June 2009).

3. Rawls, Brief Inquiry, 262–63.

4. Ibid., 265.

5. Oliver O’Donovan, Principles in the Public Realm: The Dilemma of Christian Moral Witness: An Inaugural Lecture Delivered before the University of Oxford on 24 May 1983 (Oxford: Clarendon, 1984), 4. Interestingly, Bonhoeffer was a student of Reinhold Niebuhr, the chief theological protagonist of Rawls’s undergraduate thesis.

6. Ibid., 5.

7. Ibid.

8. John Rawls, Political Liberalism, exp. ed. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1996), xxxvii.

9. Like the Nazi’s Jewish victims, Jehovah’s Witnesses were forced to wear a special patch on their clothing. They took their pacifistic witness with them even to the camps, however, where they were sought out by SS guards to work as barbers: The guards knew that a Witness would never slit their throat during shaving. Ernst Christian Helmreich, The German Churches under Hitler: Background, Struggle, and Epilogue (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1979), 397.

10. The story is summarized in David R. Manwaring, Render unto Caesar: The Flag-Salute Controversy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1962). See also my “Not Pledging as Liturgy: Lessons from Karl Barth and American Mennonites on Refusing National Oaths,” Mennonite Quarterly Review 76: 4 (2002).

11. Minersville School District v. Gobitis, 310 U.S. (1940): 596.

-217-

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The Pretenses of Loyalty: Locke, Liberal Theory, and American Political Theology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Lifting the Veil of Ignorance 15
  • 1 - Liberalism’s Turn to Loyalty 17
  • 2 - Harmonized Loyalties and Abstract Respect 49
  • Part II - John Locke’s Arguments for Toleration 71
  • 3 - Locke’s Early Work 73
  • 4 - A Letter concerning Toleration 103
  • 5 - "All at Once in a Bundle" 127
  • Part III - John Locke’s America 141
  • 6 - Refusing the Turn 143
  • 7 - Locke and Loyalty in Contemporary Political Theology 165
  • Conclusion 201
  • Notes 217
  • Bibliography 247
  • Index 257
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