The Rise and Fall of al-Qaeda

By Fawaz A. Gerges | Go to book overview

4
Decline and Fall

Operationally, after bin Laden and his cohorts were expelled from their safe haven in Afghanistan, together with the Taliban, al-Qaeda was effectively decapitated. The leadership was on the run or captured. Dispersed haphazardly into various countries, most of which were unwelcoming, bin Laden’s men were rounded up by vigilant local security services that competed with one another to show Americans that they were cooperating with them against al-Qaeda.

From Yemen to Syria, and from the United Arab Emirates to Pakistan, the hunt for al-Qaeda’s operatives netted scores of significant arrests. Iran, for example, arrested or extradited hundreds of bin Laden’s men who had fled there, including senior military commanders and members of his family. Yemen rounded up hundreds of former jihadis and imprisoned them en masse. President Ali Abdullah Saleh flew to Washington and showed his support by allowing the CIA to use an unmanned drone to kill Abu Ali al-Harithi, then leader of al-Qaeda in Yemen, along with five other suspects, as he was driving in the desert east of the capital, Sana’a, in November 2002.1

Since Barack Obama entered the White House, there has been a steady deterioration in US-Pakistan relations, culminating with the killing of bin Laden in a special operation ordered by the US president on his compound in Abbottabad near the capital, Islamabad. Despite the double game that Pakistan has played toward the Taliban

-104-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rise and Fall of al-Qaeda
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction- Life after Death 3
  • 1 - The Rise of Al-Qaeda 29
  • 2 - The Growing Rift 69
  • 3 - A Success and a Miscalculation 84
  • 4 - Decline and Fall 104
  • 5 - Legacies and Aftershocks 127
  • Conclusion- Down to Size 192
  • Notes 215
  • Index 249
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 259

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.