'Til Death or Distance Do Us Part: Love and Marriage in African America

By Frances Smith Foster | Go to book overview

NOTES

PREFACE

1. Stephanie Coontz, “The New Fragility of Marriage,” Chronicle of Higher Educa tion, May 6, 2005, B7.

2. Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Written by Herself, ed. Nellie Y. McKay and Frances Smith Foster (1861; reprint, New York: Norton, 2001), 31.

3. Haile Gerima’s film Sankofa reintroduced the concept to most modernday African Americans. The most common Sankofa symbol is a bird’s body directed forward with its head looking back. The translation I use comes from the Sankofa website: http://sankofastore.com/catalog/homepage.php (accessed November 20, 2007).


CHAPTER 1

1. New Revised Standard Version (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1989).

2. Before the Mayflower: A History of Black America (Chicago: Johnson, 2007), 29.

3. Martha W. McCartney, A Study of the Africans and African Americans on Jame stown Island and at Green Springs, 1619–1803 (Williamsburg, Va.: National Park Service and Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 2003), 35.

4. Charles Johnson et al. Africans in America: America’s Journey through Slavery (New York: Harcourt Brace, 1998), 38.

5. The epigraph to this chapter is from Alex Haley, Roots: The Saga of an American Family (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1976), viii.

6. At www.boodrags.com/Roots, accessed October 29, 2007.

7. At www.teachwithmovies.org/guides/roots-vol-iv.html, accessed August 12, 2009.

8. Justine Labinjoh, “The Sexual Life of the Oppressed: An Examination of the Family Life of Ante-bellum Slaves,” Phylon 35 (1974): 375–97.

9. Henry Bibb, Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, An American Slave, Written by Himself (1849; reprint, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2001).

10. Josiah Henson, Father Henson’s Story of His Own Life (1858; reprint, New York: Corinth Books, 1962), 3–7.

-171-

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