Typing Politics: The Role of Blogs in American Politics

By Richard Davis | Go to book overview

4
Inside the Blogs

My natural home is in the bipartisan center, arguing with center-right
reality-based technocrats about whether it is center-left or center-right
policies that have the best odds of moving us toward goals that we all
share…. The aim of governance, I think, is to achieve a rough consensus
among the reality-based technocrats and then to frame the issues in a way
that attracts the ideologues on one (or, ideally, both) wings in order to
create an effective governing coalition
.

—Daily Kos, September 3, 2006

I really hope Republicans just punt everything until after the election and
get down to the important business of making nasty attacks on their politi-
cal opponents. They’re much better at that than governing anyway
.

—Eschaton, September 21, 2006

The Democratic Party: A despicable, irresponsible fraud.

—Michelle Malkin, September 8, 2006

Tom Harkin isn’t helping the Democrats…. I blame Karl Rove’s mind-
control rays. Democrats: Protect yourselves before it’s too late!

—Instapundit, September 23, 2006

From the thoughtful to the bombastic to the sarcastic, blog content, even within the political blogosphere, spans a wide range of approaches to political discussion. Some bloggers seem to be policy wonks offering up detailed policy treatises, while others are gossipmongers interested in passing on the latest salacious rumor. Yet despite the type of content, the mode of communication is surprisingly standard, even among the influentials. All center their writing on the post. The post, a discrete entry usually identified by date and time, is the basic contained unit of blogging. Like a diary entry, it is delineated by a

-56-

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Typing Politics: The Role of Blogs in American Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Agenda Setting 9
  • 2 - Blogs and Politics 22
  • 3 - Bloggers 33
  • 4 - Inside the Blogs 56
  • 5 - Agenda Seekers 82
  • 6 - Journalists 107
  • 7 - The Audience 155
  • Conclusion 178
  • Appendix - Methodology 194
  • Notes 199
  • Index 233
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