Union Pacific: The Reconfiguration: America's Greatest Railroad from 1969 to the Present

By Maury Klein | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction

1. Maury Klein, Unfinished Business: The Railroad in American Life (Hanover, N.H., 1994), 30.


Prologue

1. The place where the rails met, often called Promontory Point, is actually Promontory Summit. The Point is located twenty-two miles to the south at the extreme southern end of the Promontory Range. The Summit occupies a plateau midway across the Promontory Mountains and nearly even with the north end of the Great Salt Lake. See Ogden StandardExaminer, February 16, 1968.

2. The detailed story of this earlier history can be found in Maury Klein, Union Pacific: The Birth, 1862–1893 (New York, 1987) and Union Pacific: The Rebirth, 1894–1969 (New York, 1989).

3. Ogden Standard-Examiner, January 27, 1967.

4. W. G. Burden to R. M. Sutton, April 9, 1965, UPM.

5. C. R. Rockwell to W. R. Moore, February 25, 1966, UPM. In the end the replica locomotives were found elsewhere. No. 119, an old Virginia & Truckee engine, was borrowed from MGM Studios, while the Jupiter was borrowed from the West Coast chapter of the Railroad and Locomotive Historical Society. See Trains, July 1969, 15.

6. Al Krieg to W. R. Moore, November 8, 1966, UPM; C. H. Mertens to E. H. Bailey, November 17, 1966, UPM; Provo Herald, May 12, 1968; OWH, October 20, 1968, and January 16, 1969; Railway Employees Journal, January 1969, 5; C. R. Rockwell to E. C. Schafer, March 6, 1969, UPM. Rockwell’s memo includes the schedule for the museum train’s tour. The schedule can also be found in Info, March 1969, 1. Info was the employees’ magazine.

7. OWH, January 16, 1969; “Golden Spike Centennial Highlights 1969,” UPM, 1. For the Centennial Expo train’s schedule, see C. R. Rockwell to E. C. Schafer, March 6, 1969, UPM.

8. Railroad Employes [sic] Journal, January 1969; OWH, January 16, 1969.

9. “What’s Happening? A Calendar of Events,” UPM.

10. NYT, May 11, 1969; RA, May 19, 1969, 12–14, 40; Trains, July 1969, 12–15; Union Pacific Golden Spike Centennial Press Kit, UPM. The description that follows is taken from these same sources. The fifth excursion train was an hourly special run from Salt Lake City over a short stretch of track by members of the Promontory Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society.

11. Pictures of the new visitors’ center are in Info, May 1969, 5. For pictures of the ceremony, see Info, June 1969, 1.

-435-

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Union Pacific: The Reconfiguration: America's Greatest Railroad from 1969 to the Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 3
  • Prologue - The Celebration 5
  • Part One - The Kenefickera, 1970–1985 13
  • 1 - The Industry 15
  • 2 - The Fat Old Lady 30
  • 3 - The New Approach 46
  • 4 - The Godfather 60
  • 5 - The Shifting Landscape 72
  • 6 - The Corporate Relationship 84
  • 7 - The Return of Hump Ty Dumpty 95
  • 8 - The Year of Decisions 110
  • 9 - The New Partners 127
  • 10 - The Coming Together 142
  • 11 - The Right Stuff 154
  • 12 - The Operation 165
  • 13 - The Marketing Maze 180
  • 14 - The Studies 190
  • Part Two - The Walsh Era, 1986–1991 203
  • 15 - The Succession Scramble 205
  • 16 - The Whirlwind 215
  • 17 - The Quest for Quality 229
  • 18 - The Enigmatic Dynamo 242
  • 19 - The Problem 254
  • 20 - The Unstable Chessboard 267
  • Part Three - The Davidson Era, 1992–2004 281
  • 21 - The Empire 283
  • 22 - The Improbable Leader 293
  • 23 - The Bidding War 309
  • 24 - The Shaking out 325
  • 25 - The Sorting out 339
  • 26 - The Changing of the Guard 350
  • 27 - The Nightmare 360
  • 28 - The Road to Redemption 377
  • 29 - The Lessons Learned 391
  • 30 - The Clash of Styles 402
  • 31 - The Lessons Relearned 412
  • Epilogue - The Next Railroad 426
  • Abbreviations 431
  • Notes 435
  • Index 485
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