What Will Work: Fighting Climate Change with Renewable Energy, Not Nuclear Power

By Kristin Shrader-Frechette | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

As this book goes to press, my heart is with my many Japanese friends who are heroically facing the nuclear crisis at Fukushima. May there be no more Fukushimas— and instead an even greater blossoming of wind, solar, and other renewable technologies.

Thanks to the US National Science Foundation for decades of research funding for my work in human health risk assessment. Special thanks for my 2007–2009 NSF grant, SES-0724781, “Three Methodological Rules in Risk Assessment,” and my 2000–2003 NSF grant, SES-98-10611, “Nuclear Technology, Ethics, and Worker Radiation Risk,” during which much of the work in this book was done. Any errors, however, are my responsibility and not that of the US NSF.

To the Autonomous University of Mexico; Boston University; the University of California, Berkeley; the University of Chicago; the University of Delaware; Hebrew University, Jerusalem; Hokkaido University, Japan; Kings College, London; Lehigh University; London School of Economics; Michigan State University; the State University of New York; the University of Pittsburgh; Santa Clara University; Virginia Polytechnic University; Purdue University; Villanova University; and Yale University—thank you for the invitations and the audiences that allowed me to present and refine many of the findings and arguments in this book. Thanks especially to the many philosophers of science and scientists at these universities who were kind enough to provide helpful comments on earlier draft s of various chapters of this book, especially Steve Gardner, Peter Machamer, Deborah Mayo, Sandy Mitchell, and my husband, Maurice.

May there be brilliant, compassionate, kind, strong, and dedicated physicians, magnificent healers like our son Eric and my research assistant Michelle Patzelt. This book is better than it would have been because of both of you. Thank you, too, to the world’s most wonderful daughters, Danielle and Natalie, and to the love of my life—my bearded, mathematician husband who somehow has always managed to inspire me and to love me, even when I don’t deserve it. Thanks, too, to my parents and brothers and sisters. Your idealism and courage continue to lead me. Thanks to

-ix-

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