Winds of Change: The Environmental Movement and the Global Development of the Wind Energy Industry

By Ion Bogdan Vasi | Go to book overview

4
From Thinking Globally about Climate
Change to Acting Locally on the Energy
Challenge

When in the course of human events, a nation’s energy policies compro-
mise the health, security and prosperity of its people, and cause global
climate disruption, a new path must be taken. We, the youth of the United
States of America, declare our independence from dirty energy. We
demand that our nation reject dirty energy sources such as fossil fuels,
nuclear and incineration, and make a strong commitment to energy
efficiency and clean, renewable energy technologies such as wind and
solar.

—Energy Action Coalition, http://www.energyaction.net/documents/
declaration.pdf (accessed December 2007)


Creating Consumer Demand for Wind Energy

In 1998, the New Belgium Brewery, located in Fort Collins, Colorado, took an employee vote and became the first brewery in the United States to subscribe to wind-powered electricity. Other breweries soon followed its example: the Uinta Brewing Company decided to switch to 100 percent wind-generated electricity in 2002, and the Brooklyn Brewery made a similar decision in 2003, announcing “There’s wind in our ales … Here at the Brewery we make use of alternative energy because we truly care about our environment and community.”1

Breweries, however, are not the only companies that have switched to green power. Whole Foods Market, the largest natural and organic foods supermarket in the United States, announced in 2006 that it will purchase wind power and other renewable energy certificates (RECs) to offset 100 percent of the electricity used in all of its stores. PepsiCo, one of the world’s largest food and beverage companies, announced in 2007 that it will purchase enough RECs (mostly from wind) to match the purchased electricity

-116-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Winds of Change: The Environmental Movement and the Global Development of the Wind Energy Industry
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 256

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.