Winds of Change: The Environmental Movement and the Global Development of the Wind Energy Industry

By Ion Bogdan Vasi | Go to book overview

Conclusion
The Answer May Be Blowing in the Wind

Carefully calculating and taking into account some insecurity factors,
wind energy will be able to contribute in the year 2020 at least 12 percent
of global electricity consumption…. by the year 2025…. All renewable
energies together would exceed 50 percent of the global electricity
supply.

—World Wind Energy Association, “World Wind Energy Report 2008,”
http://www.wwindea.org/home/index.php?option=com_content&task=
view&id=226&Itemid=43 (accessed May 2010)

The renewable share of world electricity generation [will] fall slightly,
from 18 percent in 2005 to 15 percent in 2030, as growth in the consump-
tion of both coal and natural gas in the electricity generation sector
worldwide exceeds the growth in renewable sources of generation.

—U.S. Energy Information Administration, “International Energy
Outlook 2008,” http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/electricity.html
(accessed May 2009)


A Summary of the Environmental Winds of Change

Although approximately 1.6 billion people—a quarter of humanity—live without electricity today, for most people in the developed world life without electricity is inconceivable.1 We take for granted the invisible force of electricity that brings life to our mobile phones, televisions, computers, refrigerators, and a myriad of other appliances, but we are generally ignorant about its origin. A survey of Americans conducted in 2008, for example, found that when asked where their electricity comes from, 35 percent of people said they do not know and about 23 percent said their electricity comes from “‘electricity’ or the ‘electric company.’”2 In fact, only 16 percent of respondents named coal as fuel for their electricity, and 7 percent named

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