The New Heretics of France: Minority Religions, la République, and the Government-Sponsored "War on Sects"

By Susan J. Palmer | Go to book overview

2
The Church of Scientology
Legal and Activist Responses

On May 25, 2009, the Church of Scientology stood on trial at the Palais de Justice in Paris. The suspenseful nature of the trial was highlighted in news reports claiming that this trial had the potential to put an end to the Church of Scientology in France, where it had existed for over 50 years, garnering a membership of around 4,500. Not only were its two flagship centers in France in danger of imminent dissolution, but the church itself stood on the verge of being the very first religion in France to be convicted of “organized fraud.” Moreover, if the court decided the church was to be banned as a criminal gang, comparable to the Mafia or the Hell’s Angels, its operations in other European countries might be adversely affected. The verdict was due at the end of October, and over the summer the trial received extensive coverage in the international media.1

The trial resulted from complaints, filed by two ex-members in 2008, that they had been exploited by the church and had spent 21,000 euros and 49,500 euros, respectively, on books and materials, religious counseling, and the purifi cation program. They accused the church of manipulating them so as to profit from their “vulnerability.”2

Shortly before the trial commenced, an apostate published his memoirs, fanning the flames of anti-Scientology feeling. Alain Stoffen’s Voyage to the Heart of Scientology3 related his “descent to hell” during his ten years as a Scientologist. A pianist, Stoffen claimed he was inspired by the fact that his jazz hero, Chick Corea, happened to be a Scientologist. While he admitted that his first communication courses at the Celebrity Centre actually helped him overcome his shyness and perform better on stage, he gradually became disillusioned: “[Scientology’s] aim is to destroy, destabilize the person, make them vulnerable, weaken them on a psychological level and place them in a state of dependence.”4 Stoffen complained that over the years he had spent 45,000 euros on Scientology courses and books, and he filed a legal complaint against the Church of Scientology for extortion, fraud, blackmail, and the illegal practice of medicine.5

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The New Heretics of France: Minority Religions, la République, and the Government-Sponsored "War on Sects"
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 251

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.