The Victimization of Women: Law, Policies, and Politics

By Michelle L. Meloy; Susan L. Miller | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

We have many people to thank. First, our students, who raise important questions, some of which we hope we address within this book. Some students in particular contributed with tracking down material in the library: Tiffany Foster, Michael Gallagher, John Kellenberger, Stephanie Manzi, Beth McConnell, Jaime McGovern, and Shannon Paradise, and we thank them very much for their enthusiastic assistance. Kristin Curtis was an invaluable research assistant. After this project the Rutgers-Camden librarians recognize her on sight and know her by name. Colleagues and confidantes Kay B. Forest, Ronet Bachman, Gail Caputo, Drew Humphries, and Jane Siegel engaged in lively conversations about the subject material and stimulated our own thinking. In many ways, each supported our efforts and encouraged us to forge ahead. We also appreciate our universities, Rutgers University and the University of Delaware, for providing environments conducive to scholarly work and debate. Our invited contributor, LeeAnn Iovanni, Aalborg University, offered incisive comments and generously gave of her time, reading and commenting on every chapter; it is a better book for her efforts. We appreciate her friendship and good humor. We thank our editors at Oxford: Peter M. Labella, for his patience and belief in this project, and Joe Jackson, for getting us to the finish line. And last, but never least, we thank our family and friends for their ongoing support and interest: Georgia and Julian Scott, Marilyn and Ken Miller, Arthur Meloy, Dee Phillips, Anthony Meloy, Nancy Getchell, Estralita “Cleo” Jones-Roach, Mellina Rykowski, Tara Woolfolk, Lisa Bartran, Patricia Tate Stewart, Lisa DeRosa, Daniel Atkins, Claire M. Renzetti, Carol Post, Sherry Pisacano, Nancy Quillen, and especially to Morgan Meloy and Connor Miller for making us laugh. Any mistakes are our own and cannot be attributed to the cast of characters above or to the authors and researchers that we name.

-vii-

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