Whipscars and Tattoos: The Last of the Mohicans, Moby-Dick, and the Maori

By Geoffrey Sanborn | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book was written in relative isolation, but it was not written in a vacuum. I am enormously grateful to my colleagues and students at Bard College, who have provided me, for the last eight years, with a continually stimulating intellectual environment. I have benefited from the labors of multiple generations of Cooper and Melville scholars, and the dazzling histories of Anne Salmond and James Belich lie behind most of what I say about the Maori. It would have been impossible for me to have written the biographies of Te Ara and Te Pehi Kupe without the aid of a Bard Research Grant, which enabled me to travel to New Zealand in January 2005. I am deeply indebted to the first readers of the manuscript—Sarah Towers, Jean Sanborn, George Metes, Jim Shepard, Karen Shepard, Monroe Ellenbogen, Alex Calder, and the anonymous readers at Oxford University Press—and, as always, to the exemplary consciousness of my dissertation director, Michael Colacurcio. I am almost painfully aware, finally, of how much everyone in my family, living or dead, has contributed to the substance and spirit of this book.

No debt is greater, however, than the one I owe to my immediate family: Sarah, Sofie, Eli, and Calvin. The sustaining force of your presence is what has made it possible for me to be absent for so long in the strange world of this book. And there are no words for my gratitude to you, Sarah. This book has been our secret for a very long time. Part of that secret becomes public now, but the larger, deeper part never will. That’s for you and me, forever.

-ix-

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Whipscars and Tattoos: The Last of the Mohicans, Moby-Dick, and the Maori
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Glossary xv
  • Introduction- Grand, Ungodly, Godlike Men 1
  • Chapter One- Te Ara’s Scars 16
  • Chapter Two- Cooper’s Death Song 37
  • Chapter Three- Te Pehi Kupe’s Moko 73
  • Chapter Four- Melyille’s Furious Life 93
  • Notes 133
  • Index 175
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