Foucault's Archaeology: Science and Transformation

By David Webb | Go to book overview

Notes

BACKGROUND

1. I will follow Foucault in his use of ‘man’ throughout the book in order to be consistent with published texts.

2. The French ‘le veçu’ is translated in the published edition of The Order of Things as ‘actual experience’, which has been modified here to ‘lived experience.’ ‘Le veçu’ is the French translation of the German term ‘Erlebnis’ that occurs in Husserl, and which is usually translated into English as ‘lived experience’. Adopting this translation brings out the connection between Foucault’s analysis in these passages and phenomenology.

3. Foucault actually refers to the irreducibility of its ‘space’. However, the spatiality of Dasein is understood in temporal terms. The key point is that the dimension of Dasein’s existence is the sole arena for the disclosure of Being.

4. Cf. ‘Science and Knowledge’ (AK Part IV, Chapter 6) where Foucault contrasts archaeology with a phase of analysis that is associated with Bachelard (AK 209–10).

5. Bachelard welcomed the development of set theory at least in part because it liberated intuition from sensible objects. Cf. Bachelard, ‘L’oeuvre de Jean Cavaillès’, in Ferrières, Jean Cavaillès Un philosophe dans la guerre 1903–1944, pp. 235–48.

6. The fifth postulate was stated by Euclid without a proof. It sets out the properties of two lines as they intersect a third, but it leads to the consequence that where there is a line and a point not on the line, there is only one line parallel to the first that runs through the point.

7. Bachelard gives the example of the Millikan experiment. ‘The Millikan experiment is one where the unity of the electric charge is isolated and translated by a direct action. By using a microscope to observe the movement of a drop of oil condensed upon an electron, and through the counter action of an electric field and gravity, the two characteristics of the electron, that is, its mass and its charge, can be determined. This delicate experience seems at first to be the triumph of scientific “chosism,” yet upon further examination of the philosophical problem we realise that the

-166-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Foucault's Archaeology: Science and Transformation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Abbreviations vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Introduction 1
  • Background 5
  • 1- To What Problem Does the Archaeology of Knowledge Respond? 7
  • 2- Gaston Bachelard- Construction and Temporal Discontinuity 11
  • 3- Jean Cavaillès- Grounding Thought in Its Own History 16
  • 4- Michel Serres- Mathematics, Epistemology, History 22
  • 5- Michel Serres- Atomism 28
  • 6- The Mathematical a Priori 31
  • 7- Temporal Dispersion 34
  • Commentary on the Archaeology of Knowledge 39
  • Part I - Introduction 41
  • Part II - The Discursive Regularities 48
  • Part III - The Statement and the Archive 85
  • Part IV - Archaeological Description 120
  • Part V - Conclusion 152
  • Closing Remarks 159
  • Notes 166
  • Selected Bibliography 174
  • Index 178
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 181

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.