Sounds of the Metropolis: The Nineteenth-Century Popular Music Revolution in London, New York, Paris, and Vienna

By Derek B. Scott | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The ten years of research that culminate in the production of this book may never have begun had not Helen Greenwald given me such warm encouragement after hearing a couple of my early conference presentations on this topic. I make this statement to express my gratitude, of course, and not to hold her responsible for any failings in the end product. Earlier versions of chapters 6 and 7 appeared, respectively, in Julian Rushton and Rachel Cowgill, eds, Europe, Empire and Spectacle in 19thcentury British Music (Aldershot, England: Ashgate, 2006), 265–80, and Music and Letters 83, no. 2 (May 2002), 237–58. I am indebted in my Strauss research to the help given to me by Eduard Strauss and Thomas Aigner of the Wiener Institut für Strauss-Forschung (WISF), and I benefited much from being able to consult the comprehensive StraussSammlung housed at Bartensteingasse 9 in Vienna. I am indebted to Mireille Ribière for informative advice on various aspects of French culture, and also for being so helpful whenever I had queries or translation problems with French texts. Beate Peter performed a similar service whenever I encountered difficulty with German texts. I am grateful to Bill Weber for allowing me to peruse his forthcoming book on the transformation of musical taste in the nineteenth century—especially given that the current academic climate tends to put scholars in a competitive relation to each other rather than encouraging mutual endeavor. I wish to thank the British Academy for financial help, and the University of Leeds and the UK’s Arts and Humanities Research Council for financing a period of research leave that covered the writing-up of this study.

-v-

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