Hybrid Factories in the United States: The Japanese-Style Management and Production System under the Global Economy

By Tetsuji Kawamura | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

As is always the case, overseas field surveys need a large amount of labor and very extensive cooperation and assistance from many companies and institutions, to say nothing of our individual research partners abroad. In our 2000–2001 survey, well over forty companies gave us their generous cooperation and assistance. We are very much aware that many staff and employees of the companies were involved and gave their precious time for the arrangements of our meetings and plant tours. We have done similar field surveys for more than twenty-five years. In aggregate, the cooperation and assistance provided by companies is tremendous. The project was sponsored by the 2000–2001FY Grant-in-aid program of Scientific Research (Basic research category Al) of the Ministry of Education and Science, Japan (Project number 12372004; Research Head: Prof. Tetsuo Abo, Teikyo University).

Our survey in North America in 2000 and 2001 on which main part of this book is based was very intensive, as is usual with our researches in other regions. In late August and early September of 2000, all fifteen project members, together with three American and two Mexican co-researchers, joined the surveys in four teams for more than one month altogether to cover the East, Middle West, South and Southwest, and West Coast of the United States, as well as Mexico and Canada. We visited and conducted interviews in forty-four local plants altogether, mainly Japanese and American-Korean companies, as well as their regional headquarters, sales, R&D centers, and other business offices. In addition, we visited fifteen automobile assemblers, thirteen automobile parts suppliers, eight electronics assemblers, four other electronics plants, one semiconductor plant, and one head office of sales of a Japanese company.

In August-September in 2001, fourteen project members in four groups again surveyed thirty-seven local plants and regional head offices of Japanese and Korean American companies mainly in the United States—eight automobile assemblers including two American plants, eleven automobile parts suppliers, eleven electronics assemblers, four other electronics plants, one semiconductor plant, and six head offices and other sites. Our aggregate car mileages by four

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