Hybrid Factories in the United States: The Japanese-Style Management and Production System under the Global Economy

By Tetsuji Kawamura | Go to book overview

1
Introduction
The Japanese-Style Management
and Production System in
the United States

TETSUJI KAWAMURA


1.1 Japanese and U.S. Production Systems in the United States:
The Significance of the Hybrid Model Analysis

1.1.1 Overseas Transferability of the Japanese Model

Japanese firms’ overseas production operations have steadily advanced since the 1980s. This phenomenon has highlighted issues with the overseas transferability of the Japanese-style system of management and production.1 Japanese manufacturing firms have developed a flexible production and management system, typified by the Toyota Production System (TPS), which simultaneously achieves both high efficiency and high quality. The core of the system is characterized by specific principles of production process management and corresponding methods of human organization on the shop floor. A variety of institutional settings and practices support these core elements of the system. Together, all these factors constitute a characteristic ensemble that has been defined as the Japanesestyle Management and Production System (JMPS). This system has provided the basis for a common model that functions across differences in time periods, industries, and firms.

The competitive edge of Major Japanese firms derives from the functioning of the JMPS; however, the JMPS strongly depends on the human elements on the shop floor. The system was developed within the Japanese sociocultural context, and Japanese firms preferred to export to other countries, rather than set up local production operations within them. However, from the late 1970s onward, major Japanese manufacturing firms faced difficulties as a result of increasing trade frictions and the appreciation of the yen. These difficulties obliged them to transfer local production operations abroad. In this process, they confronted the challenge

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hybrid Factories in the United States: The Japanese-Style Management and Production System under the Global Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 299

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.