Paths to Post-Nationalism: A Critical Ethnography of Language and Identity

By Monica Heller | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am deeply grateful to Nik Coupland and Adam Jaworski, for inciting me to write this book and for their support and guidance.

The research I draw on here was supported by the following agencies: the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Transcoop Fund of the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung (Germany), the Ontario Ministry of Education, the Multiculturalism Directorate, Secretary of State (Canada), le Conseil international d’études canadiennes and l’Office de la langue franÇaise, Gouvernement du Québec.

The research would not have been possible without the involvement of my colleagues and our students (and students who became colleagues): Jean-Paul Bartholomot, Maurice Beaudin, Lindsay Bell, Annette Boudreau, Gabriele Budach, Mark Campbell, Phyllis Dalley, Michelle Daveluy, Gabriella Djerrahian, Lise Dubois, Alexandre Duchêne, Jürgen Erfurt, Stéphane Guitard, Philippe Hambye, Emmanuel Kahn, Normand Labrie, Patricia Lamarre, Stéphanie Lamarre, Matthieu LeBlanc, Mélanie Le Blanc, Darryl Leroux, Florian Levesque, Laurette Lévy, Josée Makropoulos, Sonya Malaborza, Mireille McLaughlin, Deirdre Meintel, Claudine Moïse, Hubert Noël, Luc Ostiguy, Donna Patrick, Joan Pujolar, Carsten Quell, Mary Richards, Sylvie Roy, Emanuel da Silva, Chantal White, Maia Yarymowich, and Natalie Zur Nedden.

The book has benefited greatly from the close reading, information gathering, connection making, and intellectual exploration provided by Mireille McLaughlin, Kyoko Motobayashi, and Jeremy Paltiel, who accompanied me at every step of the writing project and read every word (often more than once), and if they got tired of talking about the questions the book raised, they never let on. Patricia Lamarre, Matthieu LeBlanc, Candida Paltiel, and Joan Pujolar provided keys at crucial moments. Thanks to Meaghan Hoyle and Natalie Kaiser for the maps. Two anonymous reviewers provided thought-provoking, helpful comments.

I am most indebted to the people who taught me what I learned in thirty years of conversations across francophone Canada and beyond. They may not all agree with the story I tell here, but they have always been willing to talk.

-v-

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