Paths to Post-Nationalism: A Critical Ethnography of Language and Identity

By Monica Heller | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1

1. The term literally means “pure wool” and is what you see on tags that tell you what garments are made of. The reference is to the expression Québécois pure laine or “pure wool Québécois”—that is, someone who is ethnically “pure,” or, in this case, descended from the French settlers of the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century colonies of New France. It is usually translated into English in a more politically correct way, as “old stock Québécois.” The show is produced by TéléQuébec and began in 2004. I am grateful to Mela Sarkar and Juan Abril for drawing it to my attention.

2. The data that I draw on in this book come from a series of research projects conducted in various parts of Canada, as well as in France, between 1978 and 2007. In each chapter I will provide the details of the funding sources, colleagues, and students who made this work possible.


Chapter 2

1. Sociological accounts include Hughes 1943 and Lieberson 1970; literary accounts include MacLennan 1957 and Richler 1959.

2. The material in this section was first published in Heller 1982.

3. A slightly different version of much of the material in this section was first published in Heller 2008a.


Chapter 3

1. Secondary sources include the memoirs of Gilbert Finn, an Acadian insurance broker who rose to become one of the four members of the Ottawabased Grande Chancellerie (the highest-ranking group in the order), as well as lieutenant-governor of New Brunswick (Finn 2000); exposés written in the early 1960s by former members (Dubé 1963; Cyr 1964); graduate theses (Laliberté 1983; Trépanier 2007; Belliveau 2008); two scholarly articles (Bertrand 1998; Allaire 2004); and some media accounts, mainly from the early

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Paths to Post-Nationalism: A Critical Ethnography of Language and Identity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 223

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.