A Failed Empire: The Soviet Union in the Cold War from Stalin to Gorbachev

By Vladislav M. Zubok | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Archival Sources

Archive of Foreign Policy of the Russian Federation, Moscow

Archive of the Gorbachev Foundation, Moscow

Archive of the Italian Communist Party, Fondazione Gramsci, Rome

Archive of the Memorial Society (Memorial), Moscow and St. Petersburg

Archive of the President of Georgia, Tbilisi, Georgia

Archive of the President of the Russian Federation, Moscow

Center for Storage of Documents of Youth Organizations (Komsomol Archives), Moscow

Central Archive of Documentary Collections of Moscow

Central Archive of Public Movements of Moscow

Central Party Archive of Armenia, Yerevan

Central State Archive of Contemporary History, Tbilisi, Georgia

Cold War International History Project, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, D.C.

Hoover Institute for War, Revolution, and Peace, Stanford, California

Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Washington, D.C.

Averell W. Harriman Collection

Dmitry Volkogonov Collection

National Archives, College Park, Maryland

National Security Archive, George Washington University, Washington, D.C.

Public Records Office, London

Records of East Germany in German State Archives, Berlin

Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Simi Valley, California

Russian State Archive for Contemporary History, Moscow

Russian State Archive for Literature and Arts, Moscow

Russian State Archive for Social and Political History, Moscow

State Archive of Parties, Political Organizations, and Movements of the Azerbaijan, Baku, Azerbaijan

State Archive of the Russian Federation, Moscow

State Archives of Armenia, Yerevan, Armenia


Published Documents

Adibekov, Grant M., et al., eds. Soveschaniia Kominforma, 1947, 1948, 1949. Dokumenti i materiali. Moscow: ROSSPEN, 1998.

Afanasiev, E. S., V. Yu. Afiani, L. A. Velichanskaia, Z. K. Vodopianova, et al., eds. Ideologicheskiie komiissi TsKh KPSS, 1958–1964: Dokumenti. Introduction by Karl Eimermacher. Moscow: ROSSPEN, 1998.

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