Black Culture and the New Deal: The Quest for Civil Rights in the Roosevelt Era

By Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff | Go to book overview

NOTES

Abbreviations
DRSNADivision of Recorded Sound, National Archives
FDRLFranklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library, Hyde Park, N.Y.
FTP-LCRecords of the Federal Theatre Project, Library of Congress
FWP-LCRecords of the Federal Writers’ Project, Library of Congress
FWP-PNAM“Portrait of the Negro as an American,” Outlines Folder, Special Studies and Projects, Records of the Federal Writers’ Project, Library of Congress
GMUSCGeorge Mason University Special Collections and Archives, Fairfax, Va.
LCLibrary of Congress
MPBRS-LCDivision of Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound, Library of Congress
MSRCMoorland-Spingarn Research Center, Howard University, Washington, D.C.
NANational Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.
NAACP-LCPapers of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Library of Congress (and microfilm)

Introduction

1. Eleanor Roosevelt, This I Remember, 162.

2. For an examination of southern influence on state policy, see Kryder’s Divided Arsenal: Race and the American State during World War II (2000). Also see Katznelson, Geiger, and Kryder’s 1993 Political Science Quarterly article, “Limiting Liberalism: The Southern Veto in Congress, 1933–1950.”

3. Interview with Carlton Moss by Lorraine Brown, 6 Aug. 1976, Hollywood, Calif., in GMUSC.

4. Hall, “Long Civil Rights Movement,” 1263; Gilmore, Defying Dixie: The Radical Roots of Civil Rights, 1919–1950 (2008).

5. Singh, Black Is a Country, 69.

6. This study is indebted to Barbara Savage’s brilliant book, Broadcasting Freedom: Radio, War, and the Politics of Race, 1938–1948 (1999). Other recent investigations of black cultural politics include Robinson, Forgeries of Memory and Meaning: Blacks and the Regimes of Race in American Theater and Film before World War II (2007); Sotiropoulos, Staging Race: Black Performers in Turn of the Century America (2006); Erenberg, The Greatest Fight of Our Generation: Louis vs. Schmeling (2006); Martin, No Coward Soldiers: Black Cultural Politics in Postwar America (2005). Additional titles that analyze cultural expression as part of the civil rights agenda include, but are not limited to, Cripps, Making Movies Black: The Hollywood

-253-

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Black Culture and the New Deal: The Quest for Civil Rights in the Roosevelt Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Ambivalent Inclusion 15
  • Chapter Two - Hooked on Classics 33
  • Chapter Three - The Editor’s Dilemma 81
  • Chapter Four - Constructing G.I. Joe Louis 123
  • Chapter Five - Variety for the Servicemen 159
  • Chapter Six - Projecting Unity 193
  • Epilogue 241
  • Notes 253
  • Bibliography 287
  • Index 301
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