Cooking in Other Women's Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1865-1960

By Rebecca Sharpless; Waldo E. Martin et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I have been looking forward to acknowledging the help of the many people who have shared this path with me.

Librarians and archivists make almost all historical research possible. I am indebted to the amazing people in the Rare Books and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress; the New York Public Library; the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture; the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Harvard University; the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia; the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; the Robert W. Woodruff Library, Emory University, particularly the Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library; the Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin; and the Mary Couts Burnett Library, Texas Christian University. I owe individual thanks to Tab Lewis at the National Archives; Dawn Letson at the Woman’s Collection, BlaggHuey Library, Texas Woman’s University; Muriel Jackson and Christopher Stokes at the Middle Georgia Archives, Macon-Bibb County Public Libraries; and especially Steven Fisher, at the University of Denver Penrose Library Special Collections, who has been particularly generous with his time and resources in their fabulous culinary collection.

The Baylor University libraries have provided invaluable materials and comfortable work space, year in and year out. Interlibrary Services has been incredibly helpful, fast, and important. Billie Peterson-Lugo obtained the Atlanta Constitution online for me, while Sinai Wood helped track down census data. In the Texas Collection, Aimee Oliver, Tiffany Sowell, and Michael Toon found rare and uncataloged sources. For these and hundreds of other services and kindnesses I am profoundly grateful.

Other individuals have generously shared their research and sources with me, as well as their friendship, enthusiasm, and support for this project. I thank Stephanie Cole for her vast knowledge of slaves as domestic workers and their context; Karen Cox for her work on Aunt Jemima; Shennette Garrett for sources on African American women and work; Daphne Carr Henderson for East Texas family stories; Lu Ann Jones for the oral history of Ethel Mohamed; Jamie Murray of the Brazoria County [Texas] Historical Museum for oral history interviews; Terri Jo Ryan for photos; Antoinette van Zelm for her research on black and white women at the time of emancipation; and Erik McDuffie for his studies of women and organized labor. Nancy Grayson and others at the University of Georgia Press searched their records for information on Willie Mae Wright.

I’ve received constructive feedback from a number of quarters. The Dallas Area Social Historians group and the TCU Department of History research seminar gave lively critiques. Tera Hunter and Kimberly Wallace-Sanders responded thoughtfully to my queries. Gaines Foster and Ted Ownby commented on parts of the study as conference papers, while Linda Shopes and Melissa Walker read the entire manuscript. I am grateful to Lu Ann Jones and Julia Kirk Blackwelder for their thoughtful, perceptive readings on behalf of the press.

-183-

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