Cooking in Other Women's Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1865-1960

By Rebecca Sharpless; Waldo E. Martin et al. | Go to book overview

Bibliography

Primary Sources

MANUSCRIPT COLLECTIONS

Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. An Oral History of Southern Agriculture Mohamed, Ethel Wright. Oral history interview by Lu Ann Jones. Belzoni, Mississippi, October 23, 1987

Hargrett Library, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia Akehurst-Lines Collection Corra Mae White Harris Papers Samuel Porter Jones Papers Frances Elizabeth Greer King Diary

Middle Georgia Archives, Washington Memorial Library, Bibb County Library, Macon, Georgia Jones & Willaford Grocery Account Book, 1893–94 King Meat Market Ledgers

National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland Record Group 86, Women’s Bureau, Office of the Director, General Correspondence of the Women’s Bureau, 1919–48

Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina Southern Oral History Project Nannie Pharis interviews by Allen Tullos, December 5, 1978, and January 8, 1979, Burlington, North Carolina. UNC H-39. Plant Family Reminiscences by “Mrs. Ross (Martha Plant)” Federal Writers’ Project Files Sarah Howard, Drury Ave., Macon, Georgia, interview by Annie A. Rose, Macon, Georgia Interview of “The Lil’ Black Girl”

The Texas Collection, Baylor University, Waco, Texas Logue, Bill. Oral Memoirs of Bill Logue.

Woodruff Library, Special Collections, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia Grisham Family Papers


GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS

Brown, Jean Collier. The Negro Woman Worker. U.S. Department of Labor. Women’s Bureau. Bulletin of the Women’s Bureau, no. 165. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1938.

-237-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cooking in Other Women's Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1865-1960
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 273

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.