Cooking in Other Women's Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1865-1960

By Rebecca Sharpless; Waldo E. Martin et al. | Go to book overview

Index
Abortion, 119–20
Adams, Alice: hiring, 12; workday, 16–17; hours and wages, 65, 67, 70–71, 169, 186
Adams, Mrs. Joseph, 102
Affleck, Mary Hunt, 12, 168–69, 170
African American men as cooks, 189 (n. 10)
African American women: limited occupational choices of, xi, 8, 196 (n. 45); writing by, xvii–xviii, xix; oral history interviews with, xviii–xix; need to earn wages, 109–10; increase in employment opportunities for, 174–76, 235 (n. 22); as teachers, 176; as entrepreneurs, 176, 214 (n. 83); as clerical workers, 178; as domestic workers, 196 (nn. 38, 48); as single women, 221 (n. 16); as widows, 222 (n. 43). See also Cooks; Domestic work; Enslaved women
Aggravating Clubs, 215 (n. 112)
Agricultural labor, 80
Aging, 127–28
Alexandria, Virginia, 185
Anderson, Georgia, 76
Anderson, Lydia, 138
Anderson, Maria Dupuy, 23
Anderson, Sarah Harris “Mom,” 155
Angelou, Maya, 37
Anna, 121
Anne (“Fat Anne”), 14, 142
Anne (“Aunt Anne”), 40, 41
Anniston, Alabama, 58, 186
Antimiscegenation laws, 222 (n. 48)
Asheville, North Carolina, 196 (n. 38)
Athens, Georgia: transportation in, 95; food supply in, 101, 102; turnover in domestic workers, 150; wages in, 185, 186
Atlanta, Georgia: food supply in, 51, 56; transportation in, 94, 95; boardinghouses in, 95–96; public housing in, 97–98; female-male population ratio in, 113; decline in domestic workers in, 174; manufacturing industry in, 175, 176–77; wages in, 186; proportion of domestic workers to population of, 196 (n. 48); living with employers in, 222 (n. 31); widows in, 222 (n. 43)
Auburn, Alabama, 185
Aunt Jemima, xv, xvi–xvii, xviii, 234 (n. 246); visual representations of, 180–82
Baltimore, Maryland: decline in domestic workers in, 174; wages in, 185, 286; turnover in domestic workers in, 226 (n. 25)
Barnes, Odessa Minnie, 139
Barrow, D. C., 28
Beaufort, South Carolina, 221 (n. 16)
Beavers, Louise, 190 (n. 14)
Beef. See Meat: beef
“Behind the Veil” oral history project, Duke University, xviii
Belzoni, Mississippi, 185
Benedict, Jennie, 168, 169
Benning, Annie, 178
Beppie, 164–65
Berks, Cartella. See Willoughby, Nellie
Bethune, Mary McLeod, 27
Betsey (“Aunt Betsey”), 41
Betsey (“Aunt Betsey”) (Augusta, Georgia), 46
Bette, 23
Billings, Maggie, 17, 21–22, 23
Birmingham, Alabama: housing in, 97; amusements in, 105; wages in, 186
Birth control, 119
Black Mammy Memorial Institute, 28

-263-

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