Brand NFL: Making and Selling America's Favorite Sport

By Michael Oriard | Go to book overview

NOTES

Abbreviations
AJAtlanta Journal
APAssociated Press
BSBaltimore Sun
CECincinnati Enquirer
CTChicago Tribune
DMNDallas Morning News
DPDenver Post
GBPGGreen Bay Press-Gazette
HCHouston Chronicle
LATLos Angeles Times
MHMiami Herald
NFLPANational Football League Players Association
NYDNNew York Daily News
NYTNew York Times
PIPhiladelphia Inquirer
SBJStreet & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal
SDUSan Diego Union
SFESan Francisco Examiner
SISports Illustrated
UPIUnited Press International
WPWashington Post

Introduction

1. Thomas B. Morgan, “The Wham in Pro Football,” Esquire, November 1959. This essay was the first full-blown manifesto of pro football’s new dispensation.

2. Ibid.; “A Man’s Game,” Time, November 30, 1959 (the issue featured Sam Huff on the cover); Bobby Layne as told to Murray Olderman, “This Is No Game for Kids,” Saturday Evening Post, November 14, 1959; “The Violent Fact of Pro Football,” SI, October 24, 1960. Cover stories in Life emphasizing heroic violence ran on December 5, 1960; November 17, 1961; October 14, 1966; December 13, 1971; and October 6, 1972. The November 1965 issue of Esquire included Thomas B. Morgan’s “The American War Game” along with articles titled “The Fifteen Dirtiest Plays” and “The Toughest Customers” (the issue also featured a story revealing how the players’ elaborate equipment fails to protect them). Similar stories in Look appeared around this same time, including “Operation Meat Grinder,” October 19, 1965; “A Game for Madmen,” September 5,

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Brand NFL: Making and Selling America's Favorite Sport
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Creation of the Modern NFL in the 1960s 10
  • 2 - No Freedom, No Football 55
  • 3 - The End of the Rozelle Era 95
  • 4 - The New NFL 140
  • 5 - Football as Product 175
  • 6 - Football in Black and White 210
  • Conclusion 250
  • Afterword 258
  • Notes 265
  • Acknowledgments 315
  • Index 317
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