God's Irishmen: Theological Debates in Cromwellian Ireland

By Crawford Gribben | Go to book overview

1
The Religious Dynamic of
the Cromwellian Invasion

God’s work shall stand against all opposition.

—Anonymous, A great and bloudy fight at Dublin
in Ireland, between the KING of Scots army,
and the Parliaments
(1649), p. 6

In 1641, a destitute woman, fleeing the Irish rebellion, found shelter in the porch of St. Margaret Westminster and relief through the charity of the church.1 Eight years later, with Ireland still gripped by civil war and England still reeling from the consequences, William Cooper began in St. Margaret’s pulpit a sermon that articulated the complexity of English responses to Ireland throughout the ensuing decade.2 Cooper owed his first benefice to William Laud, but his vigorous Protestantism had become clear during his appointment as chaplain to Elizabeth, Queen of Bohemia, in The Hague between 1644 and 1648. His sermon, preached in August 1649, celebrated Parliament’s “signall Victory over the Lord ORMOND,” the protestant leader of the Royalist army that had been laying siege to Dublin.3 Cooper praised the efforts of Michael Jones, Parliamentarian colonel and nephew of James Ussher, whose forces had lifted the siege, yet seemed to qualify the victory in terms that resonated with the opportunities, as well as the dangers, represented by Ireland’s Catholic majority.4 The sermon was an exposition of Zechariah 12:2–5, a passage that described “Jerusalem assaulted and distracted by Antiochus, defended and relieved by the Maccabees.” Cooper “mystically”

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
God's Irishmen: Theological Debates in Cromwellian Ireland
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - The Religious Dynamic of the Cromwellian Invasion 21
  • 2 - Conversion 55
  • 3 - Baptism 79
  • 4 - Church Government and Social Control 99
  • 5 - The Possibility of the Extraordinary 129
  • 6 - The Ecclesiastical Role of Women 151
  • Conclusion 175
  • Notes 183
  • Bibliography 237
  • Index 265
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 284

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.