A Nation of Outsiders: How the White Middle Class Fell in Love with Rebellion in Postwar America

By Grace Elizabeth Hale | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

For financial support, I am grateful to a number of institutions and programs. The University of Virginia’s College of Arts and Sciences awarded me multiple summer and other research grants and a sesquicentennial fellowship. Deans Ed Ayers and Meredith Woo, Associate Dean Bruce Holsinger, History Department chairs Chuck McCurdy and Brian Owensby, and American Studies chairs Maurie McInnis and Sandhya Shukla enabled me to take outside fellowships as well as an essential family leave. The National Humanities Center, the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, and the Institute for Historical Studies at the University of Texas at Austin have all supported various stages of the research for and writing and editing of this book, and all of these institutions are amazing places to work. I want especially to thank Kent Mullikin and Lois Whittington at NHC for bearing with me during a year in which my dad was sick and dying, Ann White Spencer and Roberta Culbertson at VFH for their support and willingness to reschedule my fellowship, Julie Hardwick and Courtney Meador at the IHS, and Erika Bsumek for helping make Texas home this year. I also received a summer research grant from the Gilder Lehrman Foundation.

Over the last decade, I have presented pieces of this work at Vanderbilt University, the University of California-Santa Barbara, Emory University, the University of Virginia, New York University, the University of North CarolinaChapel Hill, the University of South Carolina, Rutgers University, Virginia Tech, West Virginia Wesleyan, Purchase College-SUNY, the Southern Historical Association, and the American Studies Association. I want to thank all the commentators in these venues for their constructive criticisms. Jeremy Varon deserves a special acknowledgment for making sharp and yet also generous comments at the right moment and helping me to finish.

-ix-

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