A Nation of Outsiders: How the White Middle Class Fell in Love with Rebellion in Postwar America

By Grace Elizabeth Hale | Go to book overview

My agent, Geri Thoma, found a wonderful home for my project. Susan Ferber at Oxford University Press has been the perfect editor, reading every page more than once and pushing me exactly the right amount. I am grateful to both of these amazing women for their hard work on behalf of my book.

For intellectual community at UVA, I thank Brian Balogh, Reginald Butler, Alon Confino, Claudrena Harold, Chuck McCurdy, Tom Klubock, all my wonderful American Studies colleagues, graduate student members of the UVA Southern Seminar over the decade 1997–2007, and other UVA people thanked elsewhere in this list. Graduate students Scott Matthews and Megan Stubbendeck provided essential research help with this book. Scott and Lisa Goff have been more like colleagues than graduate students in the ways they have challenged my thinking and commented on my work over the years. I am also grateful to the following UVA undergraduate students for inspiring me: Horace Ballard, Veronika Bath, Aaron Carico, Whitney Gruenloh, Emily Hagan, Taylor Harris, Anna Rakes Isley, Erin Levin, Elizabeth Alabama Mills, Molly Minturn, Nora Nunn, Morgan Saxby, Kevin Simowitz, Terri Taylor, Lauren Tilton, Meg Weckstein, Shannon Wendling, Emily Westkaemper, and Ruthie Yow.

The following people have my deep gratitude for their friendship, intellectual generosity, editing help, and unwavering support for this project: Ed Ayers, Peter Dimock, Nelson Lichtenstein, Bryant Simon, and Lauren Winner. The following friends have sustained me and my daughters in ways small and large but always essential: Cindy Aron, Steve Arrata, Majida Bargach, Eileen Boris, Kathryn Burns, Scott Casper, Deborah Cohn, Nancy Corwith, Chad Dodson, Amy Halliday, Paul Halliday, Paul Harvey, Bob Jackson, Cindi Katz, Ann Lane, Eric Lott, Manuel Lerdau, Vicki Olwell, John Pepper, Kamalini Ramdas, Ann Marie Reardon, Elizabeth Thompson, Heather Thompson, David Waldner, Ann Hill Williams, and Lisa Woolfork. For nurturing my daughters through a very difficult time, I am grateful to all the folks at University Montessori School. For friendship, old and rich and deep, I thank Margaret Hall, Jessica Hunt, Eliza McFeely, and Lynn Ponce de Leon. Mandy Hoy has shared great books, long runs, her parenting skills, and her wonderful cooking for years. David Holton helped me discover my love of theater and all things Canadian. For conversations about history, cooking with kids, midnight pharmacy runs, and funerals, I am grateful to Kristin Celello and Carl Bon Tempo. I am indebted to Franny Nudelman for more than a decade of beautiful friendship, shared children, the example of her teaching and writing, and our intellectual collaboration, and to Cori Field for her grace and generosity and for our shared quest to be good historians and parents simultaneously. In the last two

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