A Nation of Outsiders: How the White Middle Class Fell in Love with Rebellion in Postwar America

By Grace Elizabeth Hale | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
The Making of Christian
Countercultures: God’s Outsiders
from the Jesus People to Jerry Falwell
and the Moral Majority

Fundamentalists have been left out of everyone else’s
liberation
.
Martin Marty

From southern California to Atlanta, as the sixties turned into the seventies, an odd poster began to appear among the advertisements for rock shows and housing notices plastered on kiosks, community bulletin boards, and commune walls: “Wanted, Jesus Christ. Alias: The Messiah, The Son of God, King of Kings, Lord of Lords, Prince of Peace.” Under a large, all-caps lead, the text listed his crimes: “Notorious leader of underground liberation movement; wanted for the following charges: Practicing medicine, winemaking, and food distribution without a license; Interfering with businessmen in the temple; Associating with known criminals, radicals, subversives, prostitutes, street people; claiming to have the authority to make people into God’s children.” It also noted his appearance and his habits: “Typical hippie type—long hair, beard, robe, sandals. Hangs out in slum areas, few rich friends, often sneaks into the desert.” Wanted posters had become markers of rebel status on the left as militant activists from Eldridge Cleaver and Angela Davis to Bernardine Dohrn and Bill Ayers escaped criminal charges by fleeing underground. Like the wanted flyers for these Black Panther Party and Weather members, this

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